District 10 and Council Updates

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YEAR ONE: TOP TEN LESSONS LEARNED

On Tuesday, regional council meets for the first time in person at City Hall. Ever since the election last year we've been holding our council meetings online because of Covid restrictions. We still have to wear masks, but I'm really looking forward to everyone finally being in the same room together. We had a brief dress rehearsal on Friday to get familiar with our desk computers and the voting system. On this anniversary I would like to thank District 10 residents, as well as the Mayor, my council colleagues, and HRM staff for their incredible support over the past year.

To mark the occasion I have a more personal post this week. Along the lines of David Letterman's "Top Ten" lists, I'd like to share:

THE TOP TEN THINGS I'VE LEARNED AS A NEW COUNCILLOR

#10) Traffic is the number one concern of residents. For several years HRM council has been asking the Province of Nova Scotia for permission to lower speed limits in residential areas but it’s slow going. In the meantime, council is working on traffic calming, better crosswalks, photo radar and other safety measures.

#9) Getting things done at the municipal level takes time. Individual councillors are generally not permitted to direct HRM staff. Direction must happen through a majority vote at council. Before a vote at council, there is usually a staff report to provide options and recommendations. Staff reports take a few months to be written. If the project has big financial implications, it will have to be added to the budget and approved. Approving the roughly $1 billion municipal budget takes about four months because we fit it in around regular business.

#8) In municipal politics no issue is too big or too small. Councillors get right down in the weeds, literally sometimes, when it comes to residents’ requests for trimming and mowing. And we also deal with some really big issues, like how to help HRM adapt to climate change. Climate change may be the biggest issue facing humanity, ever.

#7) For every request from a resident, there are at least three other requests for the opposite thing.

#6) There is often confusion about which level of government is responsible for which service. Housing for example, is the responsibility of the Province of Nova Scotia, and so is Education. But HRM is playing a greater role in providing emergency housing and HRM is also responsible for maintaining many school playgrounds and fields. Sometimes responsibilities overlap or get redefined.

#5) Social media has upsides and downsides. This weekly post can be a great way to let people know what’s going on in the district and to get feedback. But social media is not a great way to communicate about sensitive or complicated issues. I find whenever possible phone conversations work much better. Then we’re having a real dialogue.

#4) HRM is growing by 9000-10,000 people a year and that pace will probably continue for many years. Construction is booming, new companies are moving in, and young people are starting careers and families here. Although there are positives, it’s not always easy for residents living in a city that is growing twice as fast as was expected. Let’s just say we’re having some growing pains. However, growing pains are better than shrinking pains.

#3) Citizens in HRM really care about their communities. Whether it’s working at the local food bank, starting a community garden, or volunteering with their kids’ teams, we're doing a lot to help each other. These social bonds are the glue that holds our city together. If I can help with your community group or project please contact me. Email is the best way to reach me: Kathryn.morse@halifax.ca

#2) Being a councillor is not just a full-time job. It’s a 50+ hours-a-week job. I try to respond to calls and emails within 3 days. If you’re not hearing from me in a timely way, please call the Councillors’ Office at 902-490-7184 and they’ll help us connect and sort things out.

#1) Elections can change things. A year ago HRM elected its first-ever council with gender parity. It's a council with a lot of knowledge, experience and heart. Personally, October 17, 2020 was a very exciting day for me. Not as exciting as having a baby, but close. Thank you for electing me. I’m working hard to keep earning the honour.

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca
... See MoreSee Less

YEAR ONE:  TOP TEN LESSONS LEARNED 

On Tuesday, regional council meets for the first time in person at City Hall.  Ever since the election last year weve been holding our council meetings online because of Covid restrictions.  We still have to wear masks, but Im really looking forward to everyone finally being in the same room together.  We had a brief dress rehearsal on Friday to get familiar with our desk computers and the voting system.   On this anniversary I would like to thank District 10 residents, as well as the Mayor, my council colleagues, and HRM staff for their incredible support over the past year.

To mark the occasion I have a more personal post this week.  Along the lines of David Lettermans Top Ten lists, Id like to share:

THE TOP TEN THINGS IVE LEARNED AS A NEW COUNCILLOR

#10)  Traffic is the number one concern of residents.  For several years HRM council has been asking the Province of Nova Scotia for permission to lower speed limits in residential areas but it’s slow going.  In the meantime, council is working on traffic calming, better crosswalks, photo radar and other safety measures.

#9)  Getting things done at the municipal level takes time. Individual councillors are generally not permitted to direct HRM staff.  Direction must happen through a majority vote at council.  Before a vote at council, there is usually a staff report to provide options and recommendations.  Staff reports take a few months to be written.  If the project has big financial implications, it will have to be added to the budget and approved.  Approving the roughly $1 billion municipal budget takes about four months because we fit it in around regular business. 

#8)  In municipal politics no issue is too big or too small. Councillors get right down in the weeds, literally sometimes, when it comes to residents’ requests for trimming and mowing.  And we also deal with some really big issues, like how to help HRM adapt to climate change.  Climate change may be the biggest issue facing humanity, ever.  

#7)  For every request from a resident, there are at least three other requests for the opposite thing.  

#6)  There is often confusion about which level of government is responsible for which service.  Housing for example, is the responsibility of the Province of Nova Scotia, and so is Education.  But HRM is playing a greater role in providing emergency housing and HRM is also responsible for maintaining many school playgrounds and fields.  Sometimes responsibilities overlap or get redefined.  

#5)  Social media has upsides and downsides.  This weekly post can be a great way to let people know what’s going on in the district and to get feedback.  But social media is not a great way to communicate about sensitive or complicated issues.  I find whenever possible phone conversations work much better.  Then we’re having a real dialogue.

#4) HRM is growing by 9000-10,000 people a year and that pace will probably continue for many years.  Construction is booming, new companies are moving in, and young people are starting careers and families here.  Although there are positives, it’s not always easy for residents living in a city that is growing twice as fast as was expected.  Let’s just say we’re having some growing pains.  However, growing pains are better than shrinking pains.  

#3)  Citizens in HRM really care about their communities.  Whether it’s working at the local food bank, starting a community garden, or volunteering with their kids’ teams, were doing a lot to help each other.  These social bonds are the glue that holds our city together.  If I can help with your community group or project please contact me.  Email is the best way to reach me:  Kathryn.morse@halifax.ca

#2)  Being a councillor is not just a full-time job.  It’s a 50+ hours-a-week job.  I try to respond to calls and emails within 3 days.  If you’re not hearing from me in a timely way, please call the Councillors’ Office at 902-490-7184 and they’ll help us connect and sort things out.

#1)  Elections can change things.  A year ago HRM elected its first-ever council with gender parity.  Its a council with a lot of knowledge, experience and heart.  Personally, October 17, 2020 was a very exciting day for me.  Not as exciting as having a baby, but close.  Thank you for electing me.  I’m working hard to keep earning the honour.

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca

Comment on Facebook

Your district is so fortunate to have you as the Councillor! Thank you for all your effort.

Well said Kathryn!

Happy anniversary and great update! Your communities are very lucky to have you representing them.

Very thoughtful reflection!

Very happy to have you as our representative Kathryn

View more comments

SAFER STREETS; MORE GROWTH AHEAD; UPCOMING EVENTS

Two streets in District 10 now have lower speed limits. Hamshaw and Saskatoon are the first residential streets in the district to have their speed limits lowered to 40 km/hour in the past year. Both streets are narrow and winding, without much shoulder or any sidewalks. These streets get more than the usual amount of car traffic because of Kearney Lake Beach Park and Maskwa Aquatic Club. Residents were asking for reduced speeds, something I was pleased to advocate for.

Lowering vehicle speeds is proven to reduce fatalities and injuries. There are many other streets I would like to see get lower speed limits but they don't all meet the criteria and here's a bit about why.
The provincial government controls speed limits in HRM through the Motor Vehicle Act. HRM has been asking the provincial government for many years to permit a 40 km/hour speed limit in residential areas but so far the province hasn't agreed. Instead, HRM is required to apply to the province on a street-by-street basis to get permission to lower the speed limit. It's not only a slow process, it's limiting because only certain streets are even considered:

*The street must be classified as a local street
*The current speed limit on the street must be 50 km/hour
*A speed study must be completed
*There must be a request in writing from the Local Traffic Authority

For some streets in HRM, engineers and planners are making design and infrastructure changes to encourage drivers to slow down. These changes (usually made when a street is scheduled for repaving) include narrower road widths, “bump outs” at intersections, and shorter crosswalks, like the one under construction at Dunbrack and Clayton Park Drive.

It’s part of a new approach to road safety. Instead of assuming traffic accidents are inevitable and an individual responsibility, it assumes traffic accidents can be prevented through better design and construction techniques. Of course, it would be quicker, safer and much less expensive if HRM could convince the Province to allow lower speed limits in all residential areas rather than try to fix the issues with each street. We'll keep working on it!

BOUNCING BACK

Earlier this week council endorsed a 5-year draft growth plan by Halifax Partnership. Although HRM’s economy understandably took a dip during the pandemic, we actually fared comparatively well:
huddle.today/halifax-economy-weathers-pandemic-better-than-other-major-canadian-cities/?fbclid=Iw...

Next year HRM’s economic growth is expected to rebound in a big way. Our population is also expected to continue to increase by about 9000-10,000 people per year, until we reach 550,000 in 2031. Of course there is a flipside to rapid growth and we're seeing that with the housing shortage. In response, the Halifax Partnership has added housing and a well-being index to its goals for the next five years. Council has also approved many different initiatives to support more emergency housing and more affordable housing in HRM.

COMING UP: Transit Changes, Volunteer Awards, Curbside Giveaway

On November 22, Halifax Transit will introduce some major route changes including the #90 Larry Uteck which runs along the Bedford Highway. A booklet with route maps and schedules, as well as a new Riders’ Guide and Network Map, will be available this month.To learn more call 311, visit halifax.ca/transit or Halifax.ca/servicechanges.

Do you know an amazing volunteer? You can help give them the recognition they deserve! Nominate an adult, youth, or group for the 2022 HRM Volunteer Awards. Nomination forms are available now until mid-December:
www.halifax.ca/volunteerawards

The Curbside Giveaway Weekend is back! It will take place on Saturday, October 16 and Sunday, October 17: www.facebook.com/events/961869674670835/
Place unwanted items at the curb for treasure hunters to haul away. Make sure your giveaways are clearly marked with a “FREE” sign.

Hope you enjoy the long weekend.

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca
... See MoreSee Less

SAFER STREETS; MORE GROWTH AHEAD; UPCOMING EVENTS

Two streets in District 10 now have lower speed limits.  Hamshaw and Saskatoon are the first residential streets in the district to have their speed limits lowered to 40 km/hour in the past year.  Both streets are narrow and winding, without much shoulder or any sidewalks.  These streets get more than the usual amount of car traffic because of Kearney Lake Beach Park and Maskwa Aquatic Club.  Residents were asking for reduced speeds, something I was pleased to advocate for. 

Lowering vehicle speeds is proven to reduce fatalities and injuries. There are many other streets I would like to see get lower speed limits but they dont all meet the criteria and heres a bit about why. 
The provincial government controls speed limits in HRM through the Motor Vehicle Act.  HRM has been asking the provincial government for many years to permit a 40 km/hour speed limit in residential areas but so far the province hasnt agreed.  Instead, HRM is required to apply to the province on a street-by-street basis to get permission to lower the speed limit.  Its not only a slow process, its limiting because only certain streets are even considered: 

*The street must be classified as a local street 
*The current speed limit on the street must be 50 km/hour
*A speed study must be completed
*There must be a request in writing from the Local Traffic Authority 

For some streets in HRM, engineers and planners are making design and infrastructure changes to encourage drivers to slow down.  These changes (usually made when a street is scheduled for repaving) include narrower road widths, “bump outs” at intersections, and shorter crosswalks, like the one under construction at Dunbrack and Clayton Park Drive.  

It’s part of a new approach to road safety. Instead of assuming traffic accidents are inevitable and an individual responsibility, it assumes traffic accidents can be prevented through better design and construction techniques.  Of course, it would be quicker, safer and much less expensive if HRM could convince the Province to allow lower speed limits in all residential areas rather than try to fix the issues with each street.  Well keep working on it!

BOUNCING BACK

Earlier this week council endorsed a 5-year draft growth plan by Halifax Partnership.  Although HRM’s economy understandably took a dip during the pandemic, we actually fared comparatively well: 
https://huddle.today/halifax-economy-weathers-pandemic-better-than-other-major-canadian-cities/?fbclid=IwAR3xPX0-QzbsvEFi9m24LPNKz6oTB_UBfpbg4ipIR4ZMhEk_Gte7vDs206A

Next year HRM’s economic growth is expected to rebound in a big way.  Our population is also expected to continue to increase by about 9000-10,000 people per year, until we reach 550,000 in 2031.  Of course there is a flipside to rapid growth and were seeing that with the housing shortage.  In response, the Halifax Partnership has added housing and a well-being index to its goals for the next five years.  Council has also approved many different initiatives to support more emergency housing and more affordable housing in HRM.

COMING UP: Transit Changes, Volunteer Awards, Curbside Giveaway 

On November 22, Halifax Transit will introduce some major route changes including the #90 Larry Uteck which runs along the Bedford Highway.  A booklet with route maps and schedules, as well as a new Riders’ Guide and Network Map, will be available this month.To learn more call 311, visit halifax.ca/transit  or Halifax.ca/servicechanges. 

Do you know an amazing volunteer? You can help give them the recognition they deserve! Nominate an adult, youth, or group for the 2022 HRM Volunteer Awards. Nomination forms are available now until mid-December:
www.halifax.ca/volunteerawards

The Curbside Giveaway Weekend is back! It will take place on Saturday, October 16 and Sunday, October 17: https://www.facebook.com/events/961869674670835/
Place unwanted items at the curb for treasure hunters to haul away.  Make sure your giveaways are clearly marked with a “FREE” sign.

Hope you enjoy the long weekend.

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca

Comment on Facebook

At Dunbrack and Clayton Park Dr, the curb is being extended to make the crosswalk shorter and safer.

Liked your update in the Parkview News...let us know how we can reinforce the concerns that get brought to you, by way of 311 or other means. You are so correct; everything including signage, repairs, new trash bins, seems to take forever in this region. Citizens also have very little power as well.

Kathryn Morse Councillor District 10 Halifax-Bedford Basin West when is Glenforest going to get attention it is a racetrack. They city put speed bumps on the very quiet Southhill but did nothing for Glenforest and Plateau which desperately need traffic calming. Then we have the mess which is Dutch Village.

TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION DAY PLUS DISTRICT UPDATE

The first National Truth and Reconciliation Day was observed in Halifax on Thursday and wrapped up with drumming, dancing and speeches at Grand Parade. September 30th honours the memory of the children who died in Canada’s residential schools and honours the families and communities affected by the legacy of the schools. The ceremony felt both sombre and uplifting. Many of the speakers expressed gratitude that hundreds of people came out to acknowledge a history that went unspoken for so long.

In 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada issued a report saying the country’s church-run, government-sponsored residential school system was a tool for cultural genocide.
It’s not history I learned in high school but fortunately that's changing. September 30th recognizes the painful past as a way to move toward a better future.

Sometimes it's art that creates the bridges needed to move forward. Here’s a powerful musical tribute to Rita Joe, the poet laureate of the Mi’kmaq people. Rita Joe was inducted into the Order of Canada in 1989. Lines from one of her most famous poems were included in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report: “I lost my talk/The talk you took away/When I was a little girl/At Shubenacadie School”.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=UkUxIFw5vOg

WEEK IN REVIEW

On Wednesday the Mayor announced that HRM has secured 24 modular housing units that will provide emergency accommodations for up to 73 people. HRM is working with the Province and service providers to find the best sites in Halifax and Dartmouth for the units.

www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/hrm-temporary-modular-homes-1.6196620

Here in District 10, I took a tour with the Superintendent of Road Operations and Construction; attended the Centennial Arena Annual General Meeting and Regional Council meeting; and met with senior Parks and Rec staff about future district projects.





COMING UP



Saturday Oct 2-Sunday Oct 3

Community Covid Testing at Clayton Park Jr High, 45 Plateau Crescent, 10am-5:30 pm



Sunday October 3-“Electric Avenue” at the Canada Games Centre 10 am-5 pm
Explore the future of driving and get behind the wheel of an electric vehicle or hop on an electric bike. For a test drive, book ahead here:
nextridens.com/



Oct 5-REGIONAL COUNCIL MEETING


The chickens will come home to roost next Tuesday evening with a public hearing about HRM-wide rules for backyard egg-laying fowl.

Earlier in the day Council will be discussing HRM’s economic strategy for 2022-27, which will be led by the Halifax Partnership. The three key themes for the strategy are Attainable Housing, Transportation/Logistics and Green Economy. The economic strategy will be finalized next March.

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca
... See MoreSee Less

TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION DAY PLUS DISTRICT UPDATE

The first National Truth and Reconciliation Day was observed in Halifax on Thursday and wrapped up with drumming, dancing and speeches at Grand Parade. September 30th honours the memory of the children who died in Canada’s residential schools and honours the families and communities affected by the legacy of the schools.  The ceremony felt both sombre and uplifting.  Many of the speakers expressed gratitude that hundreds of people came out to acknowledge a history that went unspoken for so long. 

In 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada issued a report saying the country’s church-run, government-sponsored residential school system was a tool for cultural genocide.  
It’s not history I learned in high school but fortunately thats changing.  September 30th recognizes the painful past as a way to move toward a better future. 

Sometimes its art that creates the bridges needed to move forward.  Here’s a powerful musical tribute to Rita Joe, the poet laureate of the Mi’kmaq people. Rita Joe was inducted into the Order of Canada in 1989. Lines from one of her most famous poems were included in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report: “I lost my talk/The talk you took away/When I was a little girl/At Shubenacadie School”. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UkUxIFw5vOg

WEEK IN REVIEW

On Wednesday the Mayor announced that HRM has secured 24 modular housing units that will provide emergency accommodations for up to 73 people.  HRM is working with the Province and service providers to find the best sites in Halifax and Dartmouth for the units.  
 
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/hrm-temporary-modular-homes-1.6196620

Here in District 10, I took a tour with the Superintendent of Road Operations and Construction; attended the Centennial Arena Annual General Meeting and Regional Council meeting; and met with senior Parks and Rec staff about future district projects.

 

 

COMING UP

 

Saturday Oct 2-Sunday Oct 3

Community Covid Testing at Clayton Park Jr High, 45 Plateau Crescent, 10am-5:30 pm

 

Sunday October 3-“Electric Avenue” at the Canada Games Centre 10 am-5 pm
Explore the future of driving and get behind the wheel of an electric vehicle or hop on an electric bike. For a test drive, book ahead here:
https://nextridens.com/

 

Oct 5-REGIONAL COUNCIL MEETING

 
The chickens will come home to roost next Tuesday evening with a public hearing about HRM-wide rules for backyard egg-laying fowl. 

Earlier in the day Council will be discussing HRM’s economic strategy for 2022-27, which will be led by the Halifax Partnership.  The three key themes for the strategy are Attainable Housing,  Transportation/Logistics and Green Economy.  The economic strategy will be finalized next March. 

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca

SPRUCING UP TITUS PARK

I was delighted to see trucks and tree planters at Titus Park earlier this week. Back in April I met with HRM Parks and Recreation staff to request a sprucing up for the park. Over the summer new benches and picnic tables were added. Then this week three dozen trees were planted along the pathways.

The new trees are a mix of native and non-native species such as red oak, birch, linden and a relative of the elm called Zelkova Green Vase. There are also some beautiful spring-flowering trees including a magnolia and two redbuds. I’m looking forward to seeing these trees grow and provide some much needed shade and colour in the years ahead. Thanks to community feedback a few weeks ago, I asked for the number of trees to be scaled back a bit to leave more open space in the centre of the park for kids to play.

WEEK IN REVIEW

Highlights this week included working with residents on traffic issues, safety in school zones, and a heritage-related project.

Along with the usual readings and preparation for next week's council meeting, I attended the Canada Games Centre Annual General Meeting and the Halifax Partnership Annual General Meeting.

On Tuesday evening, Halifax and West Community Council gave the final go ahead for a 5 storey residential building at the corner of Dunbrack and Ruth Goldbloom. A few years ago the developer, WM Fares, had considered building a hotel in that location but has now decided there is more demand for apartments.

DISTRICT AND HRM EVENTS

Sept 24-26 Lebanese Cedar Festival at 111 Clayton Park Dr

Sept 25 Keshen Goodman Library Celebrates 20 Years

Sept 30 New Federal Holiday: National Day for Truth and Reconciliation
www.halifax.ca/about-halifax/diversity-inclusion/indigenous-services/national-day-truth-reconcili...

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca
... See MoreSee Less

SPRUCING UP TITUS PARK

I was delighted to see trucks and tree planters at Titus Park earlier this week.  Back in April I met with HRM Parks and Recreation staff to request a sprucing up for the park.   Over the summer new benches and picnic tables were added. Then this week three dozen trees were planted along the pathways.  

The new trees are a mix of native and non-native species such as red oak, birch, linden and a relative of the elm called Zelkova Green Vase.   There are also some beautiful spring-flowering trees including a magnolia and two redbuds.  I’m looking forward to seeing these trees grow and provide some much needed shade and colour in the years ahead.  Thanks to community feedback a few weeks ago, I asked for the number of trees to be scaled back a bit to leave more open space in the centre of the park for kids to play.  

WEEK IN REVIEW

Highlights this week included working with residents on traffic issues, safety in school zones, and a heritage-related project. 

Along with the usual readings and preparation for next weeks council meeting, I attended the Canada Games Centre Annual General Meeting and the Halifax Partnership Annual General Meeting.

On Tuesday evening, Halifax and West Community Council gave the final go ahead for a 5 storey residential building at the corner of Dunbrack and Ruth Goldbloom.  A few years ago the developer, WM Fares, had considered building a hotel in that location but has now decided there is more demand for apartments. 

DISTRICT AND HRM EVENTS
 
Sept 24-26 Lebanese Cedar Festival at 111 Clayton Park Dr

Sept 25 Keshen Goodman Library Celebrates 20 Years

Sept 30 New Federal Holiday: National Day for Truth and Reconciliation
https://www.halifax.ca/about-halifax/diversity-inclusion/indigenous-services/national-day-truth-reconciliation

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca

Comment on Facebook

Can you make dutch village rd a one way street it has huge condos but no sidewalks and cars trying to back out of papa marios

Still no mention of resolution to homeless problem and Shannon park??? Wow!

How about fighting for rent control, seniors needs, etc etc etc? We need affordable housing before benches and trees. We are paying your salary, you should be fighting for us, with real solutions.

Maggie Lisa The last post, just 6 days ago, provided this update/information on homelessness and affordable housing: Help for the Unhoused Starting next Monday, Assistant Chief of Emergency Management Erica Fleck will lead HRM's emergency response to homelessness. For the next 3 months, she will coordinate all efforts related to Council’s recent directive to invest $500,000 for emergency accommodations. Meanwhile municipal staff continue to work to identify potential sites in HRM for temporary housing. HRM is also in the process of hiring a full-time Social Policy Strategist who will focus on longer-term solutions to homelessness. For more information on the municipality’s approach to homelessness visit www.halifax.ca/about-halifax/regional-community-planning/public-safety/common-questions-regarding... A Step Forward on Affordable Housing Last week at regional council I brought forward a motion related to affordable housing. The motion requested a staff report on ways to require developers in District 10 and other suburban districts to contribute to the creation of affordable housing. The motion received unanimous approval. Once the staff report comes back, I'm hopeful council will have another tool to promote the creation of affordable housing. Right now we're hampered by a suburban plan that is more than forty years old and out of date. Learn more about these recent Council decisions, and past highlights this year: www.halifax.ca/city-hall/regional-council/making-a-difference-our-region

Mainland Common Loop Trail, Rockingham South Development, Help for the Unhoused and Green Light for Cogswell Project

Ever wonder who keeps the trails at the top of Fairview and Clayton Park looking so nice? It's this dedicated group:
Halifax North West Trails Association. On Saturday morning I spent a few hours with volunteers from HNWTA and the Princess Louise Fuseliers, hauling and raking wood chips. Not only does the Loop Trail look and smell great, the layer of woodchips keeps it drier, softer, and more comfortable for those with joint trouble. You can get to the Mainland Common Loop Trail from the Mainland North Linear Trail, at the top of Westridge Drive or Main Avenue.

New Development in Rockingham South

A proposed development in Rockingham South at Dunbrack and Ruth Goldbloom (across from the gas station) goes to community council and final public hearing next Tuesday evening. The developer, WM Fares, is proposing a 5 storey apartment building or hotel (Case 22539). Both uses are permitted in that location. Here are the details if you'd like to tune in or participate:

www.halifax.ca/city-hall/community-councils/september-21-2021-halifax-west-community-council

Help for the Unhoused

Starting next Monday, Assistant Chief of Emergency Management Erica Fleck will lead HRM's emergency response to homelessness. For the next 3 months, she will coordinate all efforts related to Council’s recent directive to invest $500,000 for emergency accommodations. Meanwhile municipal staff continue to work to identify potential sites in HRM for temporary housing. HRM is also in the process of hiring a full-time Social Policy Strategist who will focus on longer-term solutions to homelessness.

For more information on the municipality’s approach to homelessness visit www.halifax.ca/about-halifax/regional-community-planning/public-safety/common-questions-regarding...

A Step Forward on Affordable Housing

Last week at regional council I brought forward a motion related to affordable housing. The motion requested a staff report on ways to require developers in District 10 and other suburban districts to contribute to the creation of affordable housing. The motion received unanimous approval. Once the staff report comes back, I'm hopeful council will have another tool to promote the creation of affordable housing. Right now we're hampered by a suburban plan that is more than forty years old and out of date.

Learn more about these recent Council decisions, and past highlights this year: www.halifax.ca/city-hall/regional-council/making-a-difference-our-region

Cogswell Project Approved

After many years of negotiations and public engagement, regional council has approved the first construction tender for the massive Cogswell District redevelopment project. A new neighbourhood will be built where the underused Cogswell Interchange now stands. With highrise housing and parks, the $120 million+ project is designed to create a more vibrant and attractive downtown. Project costs are expected to be recovered through partnerships and the sale of some of the land. The project is scheduled to begin construction this winter.

For full details, and to learn more about the Cogswell District, visit: www.halifax.ca/about-halifax/regional-community-planning/construction-projects/cogswell-district-...

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca
... See MoreSee Less

Mainland Common Loop Trail, Rockingham South Development, Help for the Unhoused and Green Light for Cogswell Project

Ever wonder who keeps the trails at the top of Fairview and Clayton Park looking so nice?  Its this dedicated group:  
Halifax North West Trails Association.  On Saturday morning I spent a few hours with volunteers from HNWTA and the Princess Louise Fuseliers, hauling and raking wood chips.  Not only does the Loop Trail look and smell great, the layer of woodchips keeps it drier, softer, and more comfortable for those with joint trouble.  You can get to the Mainland Common Loop Trail from the Mainland North Linear Trail, at the top of Westridge Drive or Main Avenue.

New Development in Rockingham South

A proposed development in Rockingham South at Dunbrack and Ruth Goldbloom (across from the gas station) goes to community council and final public hearing next Tuesday evening.  The developer, WM Fares, is proposing a 5 storey apartment building or hotel (Case 22539). Both uses are permitted in that location.  Here are the details if youd like to tune in or participate: 
 
https://www.halifax.ca/city-hall/community-councils/september-21-2021-halifax-west-community-council

Help for the Unhoused

Starting next Monday, Assistant Chief of Emergency Management Erica Fleck will lead HRMs emergency response to homelessness. For the next 3 months, she will coordinate all efforts related to Council’s recent directive to invest $500,000 for emergency accommodations.   Meanwhile municipal staff continue to work to identify potential sites in HRM for temporary housing.   HRM is also in the process of hiring a full-time Social Policy Strategist who will focus on longer-term solutions to homelessness.

For more information on the municipality’s approach to homelessness visit https://www.halifax.ca/about-halifax/regional-community-planning/public-safety/common-questions-regarding-homelessness

A Step Forward on Affordable Housing

Last week at regional council I brought forward a motion related to affordable housing.  The motion requested a staff report on ways to require developers in District 10 and other suburban districts to contribute to the creation of affordable housing.  The motion received unanimous approval.  Once the staff report comes back, Im hopeful council will have another tool to promote the creation of affordable housing.  Right now were hampered by a suburban plan that is more than forty years old and out of date.

Learn more about these recent Council decisions, and past highlights this year: https://www.halifax.ca/city-hall/regional-council/making-a-difference-our-region

Cogswell Project Approved

After many years of negotiations and public engagement, regional council has approved the first construction tender for the massive Cogswell District redevelopment project.  A new neighbourhood will be built where the underused Cogswell Interchange now stands.  With highrise housing and parks, the $120 million+ project is designed to create a more vibrant and attractive downtown.  Project costs are expected to be recovered through partnerships and the sale of some of the land.  The project is scheduled to begin construction this winter.  

For full details, and to learn more about the Cogswell District, visit: https://www.halifax.ca/about-halifax/regional-community-planning/construction-projects/cogswell-district-redevelopment-0

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca

Comment on Facebook

Those people need housing NOW not more reports!!! There is land at the former Shannon park site that could be used over the winter for the small wooden units that were built for them and it wouldn't hurt anyone, but YOU as COUNCIL,won't even suggest it as it might "look bad" to prospective buyers or land use developers 🤬

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