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Covid testing this weekend

Anybody else feel a bit choked up when Dr Strang said he was exhausted on Friday in his live Covid update? Dr Strang was acknowledging how tired he is, how tired health care workers are, and how tired many Nova Scotians are, while urging everyone to keep on giving their best now that restrictions have been extended until the end of May. With hundreds of new cases the scale of the problem suddenly feels huge, but that didn’t stop Freeman’s Little New York from finding a way to help here in District 10. Freemans, along with a crew of volunteers from the Salvation Army Fairview Citadel and MLA Patricia Arab's office, delivered hundreds of free pizzas last week to families struggling because of the lockdown. Pizza helps, staying home helps, getting tested helps. If you’d like to get a Covid-19 test close to home, there is drop-in Rapid Testing available this weekend at the Canada Games Centre (in addition to previously booked appointments).

www.nshealth.ca/service-details/COVID-19%20Rapid%20Testing

Road work and traffic calming

With the milder weather HRM road crews have started road repairs and repaving projects. In District 10 Flamingo, Meadowlark and Ashdale will be getting a significant amount of road work this spring and summer. There will also be speed tables installed on Willett Street, with nearby streets in the school zone getting speed bumps. Speed tables are flat on top and are installed as a traffic calming measure on busier streets with bus routes. Speed bumps are installed on smaller residential streets. Council approved an additional $1 million this year to be spent on traffic calming measures throughout HRM.

Week in Review

After four months of weekly online meetings, council passed the 2021-22 budget. It’s a balanced budget and the first-ever HRM budget over $1 billion. Two of the highest cost items are HRM’s mandatory payment to the provincial government ($174 million) and compensation for staff ($433 million). In the next month or so council will start looking at how to finance some larger capital projects such as electrifying the bus fleet.

Last week council discussed next steps to ease the tax burden on small businesses. Council has been working on a plan to introduce 3 year averaging of commercial assessments. Three year averaging would reduce sudden spikes and give businesses more predictability. This is expected to roll out in the fall of 2022, once new computer systems and other changes are in place.

Council also approved planning changes to allow Akoma Holdings to move forward on the development of the site of the Home for Coloured Children in Dartmouth. The Home opened in 1921 to care for African Nova Scotian orphans. It closed in the 1980's and was the subject of a provincial restorative inquiry into abuse of residents from 2015-19. The Home will be maintained as a historic building and repurposed, with plans to develop housing and commercial projects on the surrounding site.

www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/home-for-colored-children-site-gets-council-ok-for-redevelopme...

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.
... See MoreSee Less

Covid testing this weekend

Anybody else feel a bit choked up when Dr Strang said he was exhausted on Friday in his live Covid update?  Dr Strang was acknowledging how tired he is, how tired health care workers are, and how tired many Nova Scotians are, while urging everyone to keep on giving their best now that restrictions have been extended until the end of May.  With hundreds of new cases the scale of the problem suddenly feels huge, but that didn’t stop Freeman’s Little New York from finding a way to help here in District 10.  Freemans, along with a crew of volunteers from the Salvation Army Fairview Citadel and MLA Patricia Arabs office, delivered hundreds of free pizzas last week to families struggling because of the lockdown.  Pizza helps, staying home helps, getting tested helps.  If you’d like to get a Covid-19 test close to home, there is drop-in Rapid Testing available this  weekend at the Canada Games Centre (in addition to previously booked appointments).

https://www.nshealth.ca/service-details/COVID-19%20Rapid%20Testing

Road work and traffic calming

With the milder weather HRM road crews have started road repairs and repaving projects.  In District 10 Flamingo, Meadowlark and Ashdale will be getting a significant amount of road work this spring and summer. There will also be speed tables installed on Willett Street, with nearby streets in the school zone getting speed bumps.   Speed tables are flat on top and are installed as a traffic calming measure on busier streets with bus routes.  Speed bumps are installed on smaller residential streets.  Council approved an additional $1 million this year to be spent on traffic calming measures throughout HRM.

Week in Review

After four months of weekly online meetings, council passed the 2021-22 budget.  It’s a balanced budget and the first-ever HRM budget over $1 billion.  Two of the highest cost items are HRM’s mandatory payment to the provincial government ($174 million) and compensation for staff ($433 million).   In the next month or so council will start looking at how to finance some larger capital projects such as electrifying the bus fleet.

Last week council discussed next steps to ease the tax burden on small businesses.  Council has been working on a plan to introduce 3 year averaging of commercial assessments.  Three year averaging would reduce sudden spikes and give businesses more predictability.  This is expected to roll out in the fall of 2022, once new computer systems and other changes are in place.

Council also approved planning changes to allow Akoma Holdings to move forward on the development of the site of the Home for Coloured Children in Dartmouth.  The Home opened in 1921 to care for African Nova Scotian orphans.  It closed in the 1980s and was the subject of a provincial restorative inquiry into abuse of residents from 2015-19. The Home will be maintained as a historic building and repurposed, with plans to develop housing and commercial projects on the surrounding site.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/home-for-colored-children-site-gets-council-ok-for-redevelopment-plan-1.6016114?fbclid=IwAR1j_TmQZoB8c5Z-s-2T4ose_JTzhLJRz0RO17GCHlNtgLrFOPYt04zNECw

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.

Comment on Facebook

Thanks for all your work ! Great to hear about Freeman’s. This is the kind of business we should all support.

Thanks for these updates! I really appreciate hearing what's going on at city hall.

Local Food and Week in Review

There’s a new outdoor food-buying option coming to Fairview and Clayton Park this week, just in time for the lockdown. The Mobile Food Market truck will be setting up at Titus Park on Saturday morning from 9:30-11:00 (May 1st). The market sells affordably-priced fruit, vegetables, Stone Hearth bread and dried goods.

www.mobilefoodmarket.ca/our-story?fbclid=IwAR0hcDtAxf_ZYDySh_dcz_nV-cTvq-QOyB7nP_LMM46Oxm-63_MADm...

Strict measures will be in place to ensure the market is following all provincial guidelines. The Mobile Food Market will return to Titus Park on May 15 and every other Saturday until October. The Mobile Food Market is led by HRM, Nova Scotia Health Authority and Metro Works, with many partners (Atlantic Superstore, Halifax Public Libraries, Freeman’s Little New York, Seven Bays Bouldering to name a few).

I’m hearing this lockdown is extra difficult for many families in our community. Children who usually get breakfast and lunch provided by their school, as many do, can no longer rely on that source now that the schools are closed. The federal government’s CERB (Canada Emergency Response Benefit) was a huge support in the last lockdown, but it has wrapped up. If you’re able to help, The Salvation Army Fairview Citadel (902-443-3844) and the Fairview Family Resource Centre (902-443-9569) would appreciate financial or in-kind donations such as diapers and grocery store gift cards. Please call ahead.

In council business, I caught up on requests from residents this week and participated in several online meetings. At Audit and Finance Committee the Auditor General reported on ongoing IT concerns at Metro Transit (www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/audit-of-halifax-s-transit-technology-project-find-issues-1.60...) and at Halifax and West Community Council a new mixed use development on Almon St. was approved. One of the 5 towers will be 30 storeys ( richmondyards.com/?fbclid=IwAR08u7hdvC1dMapSywEVQyWqmq_zdEJd3xe3XBdCBjXVF1JTnG315Lde58A). I also attended the Centennial Arena board meeting by phone. Thanks to the dedication of Stuart and Michelle Poteri, the rink managed to break even last year in spite of being closed for a few months due to Covid.

Finally, public feedback is requested until May 7th on the Windsor Street Exchange redesign. The exchange has evolved piecemeal over the years and now, at 48,000 cars per day, is overcapacity at peak times. The goal of the redesign is to improve traffic flow, better accommodate the needs of the port, provide improved access to Africville Park, prepare for the Bus Rapid Transit Green Route, and make the Windsor Street Exchange safer for all users, including pedestrians and cyclists. The engineers are considering various options such as a roundabout or a two-level solution. For more information and to participate in the project survey:

www.shapeyourcityhalifax.ca/windsor-street-exchange-project?fbclid=IwAR1pOTlImMSf3gB9vo1WT9rljqro...

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.
... See MoreSee Less

Local Food and Week in Review

There’s a new outdoor food-buying option coming to Fairview and Clayton Park this week, just in time for the lockdown.   The Mobile Food Market truck will be setting up at Titus Park on Saturday morning from 9:30-11:00 (May 1st).  The market sells affordably-priced fruit, vegetables, Stone Hearth bread and dried goods.

http://www.mobilefoodmarket.ca/our-story?fbclid=IwAR0hcDtAxf_ZYDySh_dcz_nV-cTvq-QOyB7nP_LMM46Oxm-63_MADm36h9A

Strict measures will be in place to ensure the market is following all provincial guidelines. The Mobile Food Market will return to Titus Park on May 15 and every other Saturday until October.  The Mobile Food Market is led by HRM, Nova Scotia Health Authority and Metro Works, with many partners (Atlantic Superstore, Halifax Public Libraries, Freeman’s Little New York, Seven Bays Bouldering to name a few). 

I’m hearing this lockdown is extra difficult for many families in our community. Children who usually get breakfast and lunch provided by their school, as many do, can no longer rely on that source now that the schools are closed.  The federal government’s CERB (Canada Emergency Response Benefit) was a huge support in the last lockdown, but it has wrapped up. If you’re able to help, The Salvation Army Fairview Citadel (902-443-3844) and the Fairview Family Resource Centre (902-443-9569) would appreciate financial or in-kind donations such as diapers and grocery store gift cards.  Please call ahead.

In council business, I caught up on requests from residents this week and participated in several online meetings.  At Audit and Finance Committee the Auditor General reported on ongoing IT concerns at Metro Transit (https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/audit-of-halifax-s-transit-technology-project-find-issues-1.6007445?fbclid=IwAR3oFhZsjPHHXR51NSNUlsVb8l3z2LBnBlHX_boOmieEaxUkGn9nYJWZod4) and at Halifax and West Community Council a new mixed use development on Almon St. was approved.  One of the 5 towers will be 30 storeys ( https://richmondyards.com/?fbclid=IwAR08u7hdvC1dMapSywEVQyWqmq_zdEJd3xe3XBdCBjXVF1JTnG315Lde58A).  I also attended the Centennial Arena board meeting by phone.  Thanks to the dedication of Stuart and Michelle Poteri, the rink managed to break even last year in spite of being closed for a few months due to Covid. 

Finally, public feedback is requested until May 7th on the Windsor Street Exchange redesign.  The exchange has evolved piecemeal over the years and now, at 48,000 cars per day, is overcapacity at peak times. The goal of the redesign is to improve traffic flow, better accommodate the needs of the port, provide improved access to Africville Park, prepare for the Bus Rapid Transit Green Route, and make the Windsor Street Exchange safer for all users, including pedestrians and cyclists.   The engineers are considering various options such as a roundabout or a two-level solution.  For more information and to participate in the project survey:

https://www.shapeyourcityhalifax.ca/windsor-street-exchange-project?fbclid=IwAR1pOTlImMSf3gB9vo1WT9rljqrokT2qbBEI5TfLleafR0WFVl55yj2tYRY

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.

Comment on Facebook

Look for the Mobile Food Market's truck Saturday morning at Titus Park, near Centennial Arena.

Kathryn Morse Councillor District 10 Halifax-Bedford Basin West you might want to check your information about CERB, it is available until September 2021 according to the website.

Local Covid Testing Site

Covid testing is available by appointment at the Canada Games Centre until May 8. The centre will offer 2500 appointments per day but you must be symptom-free to register. With community spread and a Covid case at Halifax West High School, it's a good time to get tested. Call 811 or register online:

covid-self-assessment.novascotia.ca/en
... See MoreSee Less

Local Covid Testing Site

Covid testing is available by appointment at the Canada Games Centre until May 8.  The centre will offer 2500 appointments per day but you must be symptom-free to register.  With community spread and a Covid case at Halifax West High School, its a good time to get tested.  Call 811 or register online:

https://covid-self-assessment.novascotia.ca/en

Week in Review: Policing Changes and Budget Highlights

Whether you were following the climate news or the Covid news, a lot happened last week. In case you missed the council news, here’s a brief recap:

On Tuesday Council gave the go-ahead to a project that will identify alternative ways to deliver non-core police services. A consultant will review how civilians could fill specific types of public safety roles such as traffic enforcement and victim services. The consultant will develop alternatives with a committee of advisors from the African Nova Scotian and Mi’kmaw communities, as well as representatives from health care, justice, and education. The "Reimaging Public Safety" review is part of a plan to be finalized by December 2022. I think it's one of the more important projects council will be working on for the next few years.

More modest in scope was a decision by council to remove the four-hour cap on parking on the Halifax peninsula and in downtown Dartmouth. Instead there will be hourly parking rates that will vary by location and time of day. The new digital pay stations have been tweaked to make them more readable and user-friendly.

On Wednesday and Thursday councillors voted on about $11 million in smaller budget items leftover from discussions during the past four months. We had some 9-8 votes and it got a bit heated at times, but I felt overall council found a good balance between improving services and keeping costs under control. Here are the items I voted for that passed:

-an additional $1 million for traffic calming measures across HRM,
with a focus on school zones;
-green bin collection will be restored to weekly pickup;
-blue bag pickup will be bi-weekly (saving about $800,000 a year);
-additional staff will be hired to help with the backlog in planning
and by-law enforcement due to HRM's growth;
-quicker snow clearing for bus stops next year;
-extra funds for Halifax Public Libraries to expand e-books, which
are in high demand;
-restoring the urban tree planting program cancelled during
Covid;
-and a one-year study of technical and policy options for body-
worn police cameras.

All this and more for a 1% tax increase. Council will finalize our nearly $1 billion budget on May 4th.

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca
... See MoreSee Less

Week in Review:  Policing Changes and Budget Highlights

Whether you were following the climate news or the Covid news, a lot happened last week.  In case you missed the council news, here’s a brief recap:

On Tuesday Council gave the go-ahead to a project that will identify alternative ways to deliver non-core police services.  A consultant will review how civilians could fill specific types of public safety roles such as traffic enforcement and victim services.  The consultant will develop alternatives with a committee of advisors from the African Nova Scotian and Mi’kmaw communities, as well as representatives from health care, justice, and education.  The Reimaging Public Safety review is part of a plan to be finalized by December 2022.  I think its one of the more important projects council will be working on for the next few years. 

More modest in scope was a decision by council to remove the four-hour cap on parking on the Halifax peninsula and in downtown Dartmouth.  Instead there will be hourly parking rates that will vary by location and time of day.  The new digital pay stations have been tweaked to make them more readable and user-friendly.

On Wednesday and Thursday councillors voted on about $11 million in smaller budget items leftover from discussions during the past four months.  We had some 9-8 votes and it got a bit heated at times, but I felt overall council found a good balance between improving services and keeping costs under control.  Here are the items I voted for that passed: 

  -an additional $1 million for traffic calming measures across HRM, 
    with a focus on school zones; 
  -green bin collection will be restored to weekly pickup; 
  -blue bag pickup will be bi-weekly (saving about $800,000 a year); 
  -additional staff will be hired to help with the backlog in planning 
    and by-law enforcement due to HRMs growth; 
  -quicker snow clearing for bus stops next year; 
  -extra funds for Halifax Public Libraries to expand e-books, which 
    are in high demand; 
  -restoring the urban tree planting program cancelled during 
   Covid; 
  -and a one-year study of technical and policy options for body- 
   worn police cameras.  

All this and more for a 1% tax increase.  Council will finalize our nearly $1 billion budget on May 4th.

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca

Bike Tour and Week in Review

Last Saturday Meghan Doucette and members of the Halifax Cycling Coalition invited me for a bike ride. They wanted to show me District 10 from a cyclist’s perspective and point out key locations where bike lanes are needed. I don’t bike often, and when I do it's usually on quiet trails rather than busy streets, so I was a bit out of my comfort zone as we pulled onto Dutch Village Road. It became a white knuckle ride as the cars sped past, or worse, piled up behind me. Mostly I remember the feeling of my legs burning going up Titus Street and not long afterward, the sound of ball bearings dropping out of my back wheel and hitting the pavement. Although my bike fell apart, thanks to my skillful guides, I arrived home in one piece and with a greater appreciation for the nerve it takes to cycle in parts of HRM. Thanks HCC!

Other highlights this week: I was in the councillors’ hotseat on News 95.7 and attended a press conference at Burton Ettinger where the federal and provincial governments pledged $7 million for outdoor classrooms for elementary schools in Nova Scotia.
www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/schools-outdoor-learning-provincial-federal-government-educati...
I met with the Canada Games Centre board, Centennial Arena managers, Meals on Wheels, United Way Halifax, Rockingham Heritage Society and Halifax Lancers (including Dr. Strang, the horse). Looking ahead, next Tuesday Regional Council meets and on Wednesday we start debating all the over-budget items (such as weekly green bin collection) we deferred over the past three months and saved in the “parking lot”.

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Kathryn.morse@halifax.ca
... See MoreSee Less

Bike Tour and Week in Review

Last Saturday Meghan Doucette and members of the Halifax Cycling Coalition invited me for a bike ride. They wanted to show me District 10 from a cyclist’s perspective and point out key locations where bike lanes are needed.  I don’t bike often, and when I do its usually on quiet trails rather than busy streets, so I was a bit out of my comfort zone as we pulled onto Dutch Village Road.  It became a white knuckle ride as the cars sped past, or worse, piled up behind me.  Mostly I remember the feeling of my legs burning going up Titus Street and not long afterward, the sound of ball bearings dropping out of my back wheel and hitting the pavement.  Although my bike fell apart, thanks to my skillful guides, I arrived home in one piece and with a greater appreciation for the nerve it takes to cycle in parts of HRM.  Thanks HCC!

Other highlights this week:  I was in the councillors’ hotseat on News 95.7 and attended a press conference at Burton Ettinger where the federal and provincial governments pledged $7 million for outdoor classrooms for elementary schools in Nova Scotia.
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/schools-outdoor-learning-provincial-federal-government-education-1.5985257?fbclid=IwAR2IOYTohn4kZawtEpbHat9gQGujp2t1ave4wrgiIcrL3V3QAvt2v9P6y6U
I met with the Canada Games Centre board, Centennial Arena managers,  Meals on Wheels, United Way Halifax, Rockingham Heritage Society and Halifax Lancers (including Dr. Strang, the horse).  Looking ahead, next Tuesday Regional Council meets and on Wednesday we start debating all the over-budget items (such as weekly green bin collection) we deferred over the past three months and saved in the “parking lot”.  

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Kathryn.morse@halifax.ca

Comment on Facebook

Pls make Dutch village rd a one way street from titus to joe howe

School zone safety and Week in Review

Traffic safety is one of the top concerns councillors hear from residents and I’m dealing with lots of concerns about traffic in school zones in particular. Schools in Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham were built 50 years ago with the assumption most kids would be walking to school. Now kids are often driven to school by busy parents on their way to work. The impact of this social change? About twenty minutes of mayhem in the morning and twenty minutes of chaos in the afternoon when a rush of cars descends on school zones not designed for that purpose.

Consider those stuck in the middle, the crossing guards, who are doing their best to keep children safe. At the request of a crossing guard at Duc d'Anville Elementary, this week I provided some additional safety pylons to cordon off the No Stopping and No Parking areas and help keep the peace. Thanks Cherie for the suggestion!

This week at regional council we voted to have more councillor input into the hiring of the top traffic official in HRM; to have stronger enforcement and penalties for illegal dumping; and to have an independent review of HRM’s unique-in-Canada policing model (essentially, how well is it working to have two different forces: Halifax Regional Police and RCMP?). The policing review is expected to take 2 years.

At budget committee, the Executive Director of Planning and Development presented her budget and a request for additional staff to process permits for new housing and construction, now up to $1 billion a year in value. Adding planning staff will help advance some of HRM’s key strategies such as the regional plan update, a new focus on affordable housing, the Electric Vehicle Strategy, and the HalifACT climate plan. The CAO also asked for a $2.25 million budget increase to allow hiring staff across multiple departments, to be determined.

My view is it's the right time to add more staff, and a small increase in staff can make a big difference. Halifax is growing quickly, in size and popularity: we were just voted Best Community in Canada by Macleans magazine, so let's make sure we grow well:

www.macleans.ca/economy/realestateeconomy/best-communities-in-canada-why-atlantic-canada-comes-ou...

Kathryn.Morse@Halifax.ca
... See MoreSee Less

School zone safety and Week in Review

Traffic safety is one of the top concerns councillors hear from residents and I’m dealing with lots of concerns about traffic in school zones in particular.  Schools in Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham were built 50 years ago with the assumption most kids would be walking to school.  Now kids are often driven to school by busy parents on their way to work.  The impact of this social change?  About twenty minutes of mayhem in the morning and twenty minutes of chaos in the afternoon when a rush of cars descends on school zones not designed for that purpose. 

Consider those stuck in the middle, the crossing guards, who are doing their best to keep children safe.  At the request of a crossing guard at Duc dAnville Elementary, this week I provided some additional safety pylons to cordon off the No Stopping and No Parking areas and help keep the peace.  Thanks Cherie for the suggestion!

This week at regional council we voted to have more councillor input into the hiring of the top traffic official in HRM; to have stronger enforcement and penalties for illegal dumping; and to have an independent review of HRM’s unique-in-Canada policing model (essentially, how well is it working to have two different forces: Halifax Regional Police and RCMP?).  The policing review is expected to take 2 years.  

At budget committee, the Executive Director of Planning and Development presented her budget and a request for additional staff to process permits for new housing and construction, now up to $1 billion a year in value.  Adding planning staff will help advance some of HRM’s key strategies such as the regional plan update, a new focus on affordable housing, the Electric Vehicle Strategy, and the HalifACT climate plan.  The CAO also asked for a $2.25 million budget increase to allow hiring staff across multiple departments, to be determined.  

My view is its the right time to add more staff, and a small increase in staff can make a big difference.  Halifax is growing quickly, in size and popularity:  we were just voted Best Community in Canada by Macleans magazine, so lets make sure we grow well:

https://www.macleans.ca/economy/realestateeconomy/best-communities-in-canada-why-atlantic-canada-comes-out-on-top/?utm_source=Investor%20Newsletter%20List&utm_campaign=fc3ca306a7-Investor-Insights_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0ca1a450e2-fc3ca306a7-373452674&fbclid=IwAR18DN3aZ97SKvOTGS9BIEvcPtf63tyoTGefyJIHra4FeLDUKvpjXxcvI7A

Kathryn.Morse@Halifax.ca

Comment on Facebook

More policing of cars running bus stop lights when they are letting children out would be really good, they aren't getting penalized enough!!!

I have found over the last year, folks are speeding up or down Clayton Park with much more frequency than in the past. Far too fast. There is a blind crest at Deepwood/Clayton Park/Southhill and for the neighbourhood kids who have to cross the street to get to school, or their bus bus stop, this is very unsafe. I would like to see traffic calming speed bumps put on this road like they did around Burton Ettinger. Drivers using Clayton Park to get to Duc d’Anville or the buildings at Clayton Park/Dunbrack need to realize this is a residential area. A yellow line down the centre of the road doesn’t make it an 80 km/hr highway.

More cones would be appreciated at Rockingham as well! Desperately needed and when parking enforcement comes out it only gets fixed for that day and people are back to parking on both sides of the street with no where to walk -- on a hill with no sidewalks.

We love Cherie-Lyn! So friendly 🙂

❤️

Wonderful, caring crossing guard!

Way to work with the community!

You're very welcome Kathryn! It's been great working with you. Just trying to keep all 'my' families safe!

Way to go Cherie! The Duc families are very lucky to have you!

Cherie is a great crossing guard. She is always so cheery and pleasant.

Finally,thank you Cathy.

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