District 10 and Council Updates

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CLAYTON PARK WEST MAY BE NEW SCHOOL SITE; APPLY FOR SUMMER JOBS WITH HRM; CAMP COURAGE; SNOW STANDARDS

PARK OR SCHOOL? THAT IS THE QUESTION


Next month HRM council will debate whether park land on Radcliffe Drive in Clayton Park West should be transferred to the provincial government for a new school. This location is not in District 10, it’s in neighbouring District 12, but I’m writing about the pending decision because the outcome could affect families in District 10 for many years. The potential school site is located between the Mainland Trail and Raleigh Court, across the playing field from Park West School, a P-9 school.



There's no question our community is growing and needs a new school. Elementary and junior high schools in Fairview, Clayton Park, Clayton Park West and Rockingham have added modular classrooms in the last few years to manage the increasing numbers of students. At Duc d’Anville Elementary, they had to stack modular classrooms on top of each other in a double decker arrangement.

The question for HRM council on February 7 will be whether to sell, lease or transfer municipally-owned park land to the Province. An online community consultation was held in June 2021. The majority of the 380 people who responded to the survey (69%) did not support a land transfer to the Province, mainly because they did not want to lose park land.

This will be a tough decision. Public land is precious. I feel giving up dedicated park land is a bad precedent. However, a new school is needed and there aren’t many sites available in our area. The provincial government's site selection process has not been very transparent so I don't know how seriously other sites were considered. HRM staff will provide a report with recommendations closer to the February 7 Regional Council meeting. Until then you may want to take a look at previous HRM reports on the issue:

cdn.halifax.ca/sites/default/files/documents/city-hall/regional-council/211207rc1514.pdf

cdn.halifax.ca/sites/default/files/documents/city-hall/regional-council/210126rc1113.pdf

SUMMER RECREATION JOBS-APPLY FEB 3

HRM is now recruiting for its summer recreation team. There are a variety of positions available for students and young adults in recreation programming, aquatics and inclusion support. These fun summer jobs pay $16.30 to $19.30 per hour. Early application deadline is February 3 for some positions. Check out the opportunities:

www.halifax.ca/about-halifax/employment/seasonal-youth-employment-recreation

CAMP COURAGE FOR THOSE WHO DARE

Do you know a young woman 15-19 who is considering a career in emergency services? Tell her about Camp Courage, an empowering summer camp offered by the First Responders Society for young women and gender diverse youth:

campcourage.ca/

Camp Courage introduces emergency services skills such as first aid, self-defence, climbing huge ladders, and putting out fires (sounds like good training for any career!). Partners include Halifax Regional Fire and Emergency, Halifax Regional Police, RCMP, Emergency Medical Care and Canadian Armed Forces. Only 24 spots available so apply now.

SAY IT ISN'T SNOW!

Well it looks like we're getting some winter after all. If you're wondering why your street was plowed only down the middle yesterday that's actually the service standard. Plow operators are required to do a first pass of residential streets to provide emergency access. Once the first pass is done, they come back to do more complete plowing. Fire, ambulance and bus routes, as well as high traffic streets, are given priority for clearing.

For more on service standards see: halifax.ca/snow


COUNCILLOR KATHRYN MORSE
DISTRICT 10
HALIFAX – BEDFORD BASIN WEST
(FAIRVIEW, CLAYTON PARK AND ROCKINGHAM)
KATHRYN.MORSE@HALIFAX.CA
... See MoreSee Less

CLAYTON PARK WEST MAY BE NEW SCHOOL SITE; APPLY FOR SUMMER JOBS WITH HRM; CAMP COURAGE; SNOW STANDARDS

PARK OR SCHOOL? THAT IS THE QUESTION

 
Next month HRM council will debate whether park land on Radcliffe Drive in Clayton Park West should be transferred to the provincial government for a new school.  This location is not in District 10, it’s in neighbouring District 12, but I’m writing about the pending decision because the outcome could affect families in District 10 for many years.  The potential school site is located between the Mainland Trail and Raleigh Court, across the playing field from Park West School, a P-9 school.       

 

Theres no question our community is growing and needs a new school.  Elementary and junior high schools in Fairview, Clayton Park, Clayton Park West and Rockingham have added modular classrooms in the last few years to manage the increasing numbers of students.  At Duc d’Anville Elementary, they had to stack modular classrooms on top of each other in a double decker arrangement.  

The question for HRM council on February 7 will be whether to sell, lease or transfer municipally-owned park land to the Province.  An online community consultation was held in June 2021.  The majority of the 380 people who responded to the survey (69%) did not support a land transfer to the Province, mainly because they did not want to lose park land.  

This will be a tough decision.  Public land is precious.  I feel giving up dedicated park land is a bad precedent. However, a new school is needed and there aren’t many sites available in our area.  The provincial governments site selection process has not been very transparent so I dont know how seriously other sites were considered.  HRM staff will provide a report with recommendations closer to the February 7 Regional Council meeting.  Until then you may want to take a look at previous HRM reports on the issue:

https://cdn.halifax.ca/sites/default/files/documents/city-hall/regional-council/211207rc1514.pdf

https://cdn.halifax.ca/sites/default/files/documents/city-hall/regional-council/210126rc1113.pdf

SUMMER RECREATION JOBS-APPLY FEB 3

HRM is now recruiting for its summer recreation team. There are a variety of positions available for students and young adults in recreation programming, aquatics and inclusion support.  These fun summer jobs pay $16.30 to $19.30 per hour.  Early application deadline is February 3 for some positions.  Check out the opportunities:

https://www.halifax.ca/about-halifax/employment/seasonal-youth-employment-recreation

CAMP COURAGE FOR THOSE WHO DARE

Do you know a young woman 15-19 who is considering a career in emergency services? Tell her about Camp Courage, an empowering summer camp offered by the First Responders Society for young women and gender diverse youth:

https://campcourage.ca/

Camp Courage introduces emergency services skills such as first aid, self-defence, climbing huge ladders, and putting out fires (sounds like good training for any career!).  Partners include Halifax Regional Fire and Emergency, Halifax Regional Police, RCMP, Emergency Medical Care and Canadian Armed Forces.  Only 24 spots available so apply now. 

SAY IT ISNT SNOW!

Well it looks like were getting some winter after all.  If youre wondering why your street was plowed only down the middle yesterday thats actually the service standard.  Plow operators are required to do a first pass of residential streets to provide emergency access.  Once the first pass is done, they come back to do more complete plowing.  Fire, ambulance and bus routes, as well as high traffic streets, are given priority for clearing. 

For more on service standards see: halifax.ca/snow

  
COUNCILLOR KATHRYN MORSE
DISTRICT 10
HALIFAX – BEDFORD BASIN WEST
(FAIRVIEW, CLAYTON PARK AND ROCKINGHAM)
KATHRYN.MORSE@HALIFAX.CA

Comment on Facebook

Here's an idea. Build a new high school in Bayers Lake area. Then make the current Halifax West a Junior high to take in CP, Fairview, PW students. Then you free up Fairview and CP (also alleviate some crowding at PW). From there you could spread out the over crowded elementary schools. You could also make a new high school grades 9-12and then work backwards from there with all the other schools.

Thank you Kathryn for posting about this possible loss of parkland. I hate to see parkland lost to concrete and buildings. This move by the city is short sighted and hurts our climate adaptability and bio diversity. Other cities around the world are planting micro forests wherever they can to help keep temperatures down and support a more liveable city. Let’s find other good solutions as Mario Eleftheros has shown us!

The need for new schools cannot be overstated. The current situation is terrible. I'm a parent of a nine year old at Burton Ettinger and a substitute teacher (have worked at several schools in the area). The overcrowding is insane. There are not adequate bathroom facilities for the amount of kids. Two classes have to do gym class at the same time. Pre-Primary kids have no outdoor playground because the playgrounds are rated 5+. There are accessibility concerns with the older schools (especially Fairview Heights Main building). Cramming more kids into portables with no plumbing is not a long term solution. Schools that were build to serve 300 students are now serving 600 with no increase in facilities such as bathrooms, Gyms, Libraries, etc. I also hate the thought of giving up parkland but our kids deserve better.

Mario Eleftheros brilliant. We need parkland and Bayers Lake is already a wasteland might as well make use of it. And the Chain Of Lakes trail could be expanded so kids could walk or bike to School.

We should Not be building on the precious little parkland we have left. Mario Eleftheros proposed a brilliant idea. Hopefully Kathryn Morse you can promote it as a much better idea then building a school on parkland.

Councillor Morse Thank you for the update. Please vote against the transfer of the land to to the province and encourage them to find another site. Joel Buckler

I would love to see existing schools meaningfully expanded. I think it's important to keep kids in their neighborhood as as much as possible. The situation is Fairview is pretty dire, and it sounds like Clayton park and other areas aren't any better. One new school is great, but all of the schools in the area should be reviewed for serious, permanent upgrades. My daughter is in a classroom that used to be their library because they ran out of space at Burton Ettinger. That school also has to do split recesses or else it would be too many kids outside and they cant have assemblies or concerts because it maxes out fire code regs.

Thanks for this post. Save the Park..after all, this is Clayton Park! A public meeting, in the District is needed for an open & transparent discussion about research done to date by the province and municipality. It seems we are still working in isolation, especially avoiding the taxpayers! Another ideal site could be the Motherhouse lands where construction for 7000 new residents is proposed. It's also adjacent to MSVU where Education students could do some of their practicum teaching. Bring it on at this alternate site, walkable from several neighbourhoods.🌲

Undeveloped land is so precious - especially with the amount of high and medium density development happening in the area.

Just a minor detail...the 'green space' adjacent to Park West does not have HRM field status so does not serve the existing school adequately, never mind a second school...no goal posts, painted lines, turf, bleachers or other assets most other HRCE/HRM junior high schools enjoy.

Withe the Sobeys development coming with purportedly 2000 rental units, the kids that live there will have to have a school to go to. Has the province even considered the lack of infrastructure while trying to double our population?

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Lovely picture

LOW RISE HOUSING PROPOSED FOR WEDGEWOOD MOTEL; PROPERTY ASSESSMENTS; COUNCIL HIGHLIGHTS; COMMUNITY GRANTS AVAILABLE; VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY

MOTEL'S DAYS ARE NUMBERED

Rockingham residents have been asking me recently what's going on with the Wedgewood Motel (374 Bedford Highway at Kearney Lake Rd). Built in the 1960s, the Wedgewood is showing its age. The motel's sign advertises "Very Low Rates".

A few weeks before Christmas the owners applied to HRM for a permit to redevelop the site as an apartment building. A four storey building with 99 units and two levels of underground parking is being proposed. The preliminary design, by WM Fares, looks similar in style to the buildings at Rockingham South on Wentworth Drive, also designed by WM Fares. Since the zoning (C2B-Highway Commercial) permits a maximum of four storeys in this location, and the proposed building is four storeys, it is likely to be permitted. Housing developments that are in keeping with existing height and zoning requirements do not require public hearings.

PROPERTY ASSESSMENTS UP

By now most residents should have received their property assessments in the mail from Property Valuation Services Corporation (PVSC) an independent, non-government organization. Your assessed value is based on the price of house sales in your neighbourhood, and as expected in a hot housing market, most assessed values in HRM have gone up. You can appeal but if you are considering doing so, it’s a good idea to call PVSC first at 1-800-380-7775 and speak to an assessor to make sure you have reasonable grounds for an appeal. You have until Feb 9.

As a reminder: an increase in your assessed value does not automatically mean an increase in your property tax bill. HRM’s tax rate is still to be determined through Regional Council budget discussions over the next three months. First council has to figure out how much revenue will be needed to cover expected expenses, and then we work backwards to determine the tax rate based on average assessments.

Council always tries to keep the tax rate as low as possible however HRM is not immune from high inflation, high interest rates, and high fuel and material costs that most cities are experiencing. There is also more demand for services in HRM from another record-breaking increase in population. We live in interesting times!

COUNCIL HIGHLIGHTS JAN 10

Highlights of last Tuesday’s council meeting included discussions about proposed improvements for Brunswick Street, rural transit, and zoning changes for Hammonds Plains.

Council voted to move forward to the design phase for Brunswick Street. This streeetscaping project will redesign the high profile blocks from Spring Garden Rd to the Citadel, one of Canada's most visited historic sites. The design will add more lighting, trees and benches to this area. It will also develop designs for pedestrian and cycling infrastructure to provide better links between the north and south ends of Halifax. It’s a “Complete Streets” project that will come back to council in about a year for approval:

www.shapeyourcityhalifax.ca/rainnie-brunswick-complete-streets

Council also looked at ways of financing regional and rural public transit in HRM. This is a challenging task in a municipality the size of Prince Edward Island. Given the huge distances in HRM and increasing fuel costs, rural public transit providers are feeling the squeeze. There weren't clear answers so this item was deferred for a staff report and more detailed options.

Finally, council voted unanimously to lower the residential housing density permitted in Hammonds Plains, a historic African Nova Scotian community near Bedford. About 40 members of the community attended a public hearing to voice support for restrictions on development. Most residents of Hammond Plains felt the zoning was too permissive of large-scale housing projects in a community reliant on septic systems and a single entrance/exit point. Council agreed. The changes approved on Tuesday will allow time for more appropriate zoning to be developed in collaboration with the community.

APPLY FOR COMMUNITY GRANTS

The Community Grants Program is now accepting applications. This program provides cash grants of $5000 and $25,000 to registered non-profit organizations and charities in HRM.

The application deadline is March 31.

Application forms and program guidebooks are available:
Online at www.halifax.ca/business/doing-business-halifax/community-grants
At the HRM Customer Service Centre: 7071 Bayers Road, 2nd floor
By contacting 311
Or by emailing nonprofitgrants@halifax.ca

For details, please email nonprofitgrants@halifax.ca, call 902.490.7310 or contact me.

VOLUNTEER FOR THE AFRICAN DESCENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE

HRM is recruiting 13 residents of the municipality to sit on the African Descent Advisory Committee. This new volunteer committee will advise Regional Council on the impact of municipal policies, programs and services for People of African Descent. Learn more about this opportunity and apply online at www.halifax.ca/serve. Apply until January 31.

COUNCILLOR KATHRYN MORSE
DISTRICT 10
HALIFAX – BEDFORD BASIN WEST
(FAIRVIEW, CLAYTON PARK AND ROCKINGHAM)
KATHRYN.MORSE@HALIFAX.CA
... See MoreSee Less

LOW RISE HOUSING PROPOSED FOR WEDGEWOOD MOTEL; PROPERTY ASSESSMENTS; COUNCIL HIGHLIGHTS; COMMUNITY GRANTS AVAILABLE; VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY

MOTELS DAYS ARE NUMBERED 

Rockingham residents have been asking me recently whats going on with the Wedgewood Motel (374 Bedford Highway at Kearney Lake Rd).  Built in the 1960s, the Wedgewood is showing its age.  The motels sign advertises Very Low Rates.

A few weeks before Christmas the owners applied to HRM for a permit to redevelop the site as an apartment building.   A four storey building with 99 units and two levels of underground parking is being proposed.  The preliminary design, by WM Fares, looks similar in style to the buildings at Rockingham South on Wentworth Drive, also designed by WM Fares.  Since the zoning (C2B-Highway Commercial) permits a maximum of four storeys in this location, and the proposed building is four storeys, it is likely to be permitted.  Housing developments that are in keeping with existing height and zoning requirements do not require public hearings.   

PROPERTY ASSESSMENTS UP

By now most residents should have received their property assessments in the mail from Property Valuation Services Corporation (PVSC) an independent, non-government organization.  Your assessed value is based on the price of house sales in your neighbourhood, and as expected in a hot housing market, most assessed values in HRM have gone up.  You can appeal but if you are considering doing so, it’s a good idea to call PVSC first at 1-800-380-7775 and speak to an assessor to make sure you have reasonable grounds for an appeal.  You have until Feb 9.

As a reminder:  an increase in your assessed value does not automatically mean an increase in your property tax bill.  HRM’s tax rate is still to be determined through Regional Council budget discussions over the next three months.  First council has to figure out how much revenue will be needed to cover expected expenses, and then we work backwards to determine the tax rate based on average assessments.  

Council always tries to keep the tax rate as low as possible however HRM is not immune from high inflation, high interest rates, and high fuel and material costs that most cities are experiencing.  There is also more demand for services in HRM from another record-breaking increase in population.  We live in interesting times!

COUNCIL HIGHLIGHTS JAN 10

Highlights of last Tuesday’s council meeting included discussions about proposed improvements for Brunswick Street, rural transit, and zoning changes for Hammonds Plains.  

Council voted to move forward to the design phase for Brunswick Street.  This streeetscaping project will redesign the high profile blocks from Spring Garden Rd to the Citadel, one of Canadas most visited historic sites.  The design will add more lighting, trees and benches to this area.  It will also develop designs for pedestrian and cycling infrastructure to provide better links between the north and south ends of Halifax.  It’s a “Complete Streets” project that will come back to council in about a year for approval:

https://www.shapeyourcityhalifax.ca/rainnie-brunswick-complete-streets

Council also looked at ways of financing regional and rural public transit in HRM.  This is a challenging task in a municipality the size of Prince Edward Island.  Given the huge distances in HRM and increasing fuel costs, rural public transit providers are feeling the squeeze.  There werent clear answers so this item was deferred for a staff report and more detailed options. 

Finally, council voted unanimously to lower the residential housing density permitted in Hammonds Plains, a historic African Nova Scotian community near Bedford.  About 40 members of the community attended a public hearing to voice support for restrictions on development.  Most residents of Hammond Plains felt the zoning was too permissive of large-scale housing projects in a community reliant on septic systems and a single entrance/exit point.  Council agreed.  The changes approved on Tuesday will allow time for more appropriate zoning to be developed in collaboration with the community.

APPLY FOR COMMUNITY GRANTS 

The Community Grants Program is now accepting applications. This program provides cash grants of $5000 and $25,000 to registered non-profit organizations and charities in HRM. 

The application deadline is March 31. 

Application forms and program guidebooks are available: 
Online at www.halifax.ca/business/doing-business-halifax/community-grants 
At the HRM Customer Service Centre: 7071 Bayers Road, 2nd floor
By contacting 311   
Or by emailing nonprofitgrants@halifax.ca  

For details, please email nonprofitgrants@halifax.ca, call 902.490.7310 or contact me. 

VOLUNTEER FOR THE AFRICAN DESCENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE

HRM is recruiting 13 residents of the municipality to sit on the African Descent Advisory Committee.  This new volunteer committee will advise Regional Council on the impact of municipal policies, programs and services for People of African Descent. Learn more about this opportunity and apply online at www.halifax.ca/serve.  Apply until January 31.

COUNCILLOR KATHRYN MORSE
DISTRICT 10
HALIFAX – BEDFORD BASIN WEST
(FAIRVIEW, CLAYTON PARK AND ROCKINGHAM)
KATHRYN.MORSE@HALIFAX.CA

Comment on Facebook

Councillor Morse, your updates are appreciated. I do hope that when HRM is setting the 2023 tax rate, they will keep in mind that, although costs to run the city have, of course, increased, residents are currently squeezed by high housing costs, high heating costs, high food costs, rising mortgage rates, etc without a corresponding increase in income to cover these increases. Council must work harder than ever to look at efficiencies in delivering services so that taxes paid in the coming year are not greater than the previous year. A tax increase that matches the current inflation rate will cause real hardship for many residents.

So instead of affordable housing, council is going to permit more over priced housing. How does this fix the on going issue of affordable housing?

Thank god. So much trash everywhere. Wouldn’t be so bad if i was clean…

Awesome! The motel is an eye sore now! Police visit frequently!

Thanks for the update.

Thanks for the update

Bye bye view for the houses in behind on Birch Cove lane - 4 story with underground parking

Just a bit of debris on the floor…. 🤦‍♂️ I understand being in dire straits but have a little pride. Sheesh. An unbelievable eyesore this place.

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NEW COMMUNITY NAVIGATOR AT KESHEN GOODMAN LIBRARY; LIBRARY PROGRAMS

INTRODUCING CHRIS ROGERS

Halifax is fortunate to have an outstanding library system staffed by caring people. At one time our libraries offered books and a quiet place to read them, but Halifax’s modern public libraries offer so much more. Along with lending print books, Halifax Public Libraries lend e-books, audiobooks, movies, music, musical instruments, radon detectors, wellness lamps, Nordic poles, and ice grips for winter hiking (see ‘Beyond Books’ on HPL’s main page). At our libraries residents can participate in concerts, newcomers’ language programs, income tax clinics, and a wide range of classes for tots, teens and adults. HRM’s libraries are real community hubs.

In this part of HRM, Keshen Goodman library on Lacewood was already a welcoming place and now it's even more welcoming with the recent addition of Community Navigator Chris Rogers. Chris will be helping residents find the services they need through the gateway of the library. Whether residents are looking for English language classes, employment programs or housing assistance, Chris will make those important connections happen. Chris is bound to be busy: Keshen Goodman is HRM’s second most-visited library, after Central on Spring Garden Road!



STICK TO YOUR RESOLUTION WITH THE LIBRARY



Maybe your New Year’s Resolution was to move more, volunteer more, get out of the house more, or all of the above. If so, our libraries have lots of options for you. Check out “What’s On” through this link:

www.halifaxpubliclibraries.ca/



Here is a small sample of what you'll find at our libraries on the themes of moving more, volunteering more and getting out more:

A free movement class at Keshen Goodman:
Moving with Mocean Dance: 4-Week Series

halifax.bibliocommons.com/events/637bb49df47e449f9ecc44aa

Volunteer opportunities:

www.halifaxpubliclibraries.ca/support/volunteer/?utm_source=enewsletter&utm_medium=web&utm_campai...



Toastmasters at Keshen Goodman:



halifax.bibliocommons.com/events/638f773f38ef064200d3e88e



Upcoming free symphony concert at Central Library:



halifax.bibliocommons.com/events/63a603d70748ed36005f8690



Happy New Year!

COUNCILLOR KATHRYN MORSE
DISTRICT 10
HALIFAX – BEDFORD BASIN WEST
(FAIRVIEW, CLAYTON PARK AND ROCKINGHAM)
KATHRYN.MORSE@HALIFAX.CA
... See MoreSee Less

NEW COMMUNITY NAVIGATOR AT KESHEN GOODMAN LIBRARY; LIBRARY PROGRAMS

INTRODUCING CHRIS ROGERS

Halifax is fortunate to have an outstanding library system staffed by caring people.  At one time our libraries offered books and a quiet place to read them, but Halifax’s modern public libraries offer so much more.  Along with lending print books,  Halifax Public Libraries lend e-books, audiobooks, movies, music, musical instruments, radon detectors, wellness lamps, Nordic poles, and ice grips for winter hiking (see ‘Beyond Books’ on HPL’s main page).  At our libraries residents can participate in concerts, newcomers’ language programs, income tax clinics, and a wide range of classes for tots, teens and adults.  HRM’s libraries are real community hubs.

In this part of HRM, Keshen Goodman library on Lacewood was already a welcoming place and now its even more welcoming with the recent addition of Community Navigator Chris Rogers.  Chris will be helping residents find the services they need through the gateway of the library.  Whether residents are looking for English language classes, employment programs or housing assistance, Chris will make those important connections happen.  Chris is bound to be busy:  Keshen Goodman is HRM’s second most-visited library, after Central on Spring Garden Road!

 

STICK TO YOUR RESOLUTION WITH THE LIBRARY

 

Maybe your New Year’s Resolution was to move more, volunteer more, get out of the house more, or all of the above. If so, our libraries have lots of options for you.  Check out “What’s On” through this link:

https://www.halifaxpubliclibraries.ca/

 

Here is a small sample of what youll find at our libraries on the themes of moving more, volunteering more and getting out more:

A free movement class at Keshen Goodman:
Moving with Mocean Dance: 4-Week Series

https://halifax.bibliocommons.com/events/637bb49df47e449f9ecc44aa

Volunteer opportunities:

https://www.halifaxpubliclibraries.ca/support/volunteer/?utm_source=enewsletter&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=vr_2022&utm_content=dec

 

Toastmasters at Keshen Goodman:

 

https://halifax.bibliocommons.com/events/638f773f38ef064200d3e88e

 

Upcoming free symphony concert at Central Library:

 

https://halifax.bibliocommons.com/events/63a603d70748ed36005f8690

 

Happy New Year!

COUNCILLOR KATHRYN MORSE
DISTRICT 10
HALIFAX – BEDFORD BASIN WEST
(FAIRVIEW, CLAYTON PARK AND ROCKINGHAM)
KATHRYN.MORSE@HALIFAX.CA

Comment on Facebook

You weren't wrong when you said it USED to be quiet, now you can't hear yourself think when you go into any part of the library even the parts that are SUPPOSED to be soundproofed!

Thanks for some updates & Happy Healthy New Year to all ☺️☮️

I value public libraries so much--and I'm proud to live in a place where libraries are stepping up to be a public resource for so many kinds of knowledge sharing, for all kinds of people...for free, available to all. Way to go Keshen Goodman Library for getting a resource navigator! These services make us all better!

This is a very progressive addition to HPL's services.

I appreciate how you spread the word about what sorts of things are happening in the community.

Happy New Year, Councillor Morse. All the best for 2023.

PLEASE PAY ATTENTION!

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NEW WHEELCHAIRS FOR SENIORS' HOME; NEW BOSS AT HRM; NORA BERNARD STREET, LESS MONEY FOR SIDEWALKS AND OTHER COUNCIL DECISIONS; NOMINATE VOLUNTEERS; WINTER PARKING BAN IN EFFECT; HOLIDAY LIGHTS

WHEELY WORKING TOGETHER

A few months ago Audrey Bennett got in touch with me (photo right, with friend Brenda Gilks on left). Audrey is originally from the west coast of Newfoundland and she lives at MacDonald Laurier Place, a senors' home on Ford Street. Audrey is one of those big hearted people who's always organizing card games and special events at the home. She told me some of the less mobile residents were having trouble getting to the social events and asked for funding for two wheelchairs. Councillors are not permitted to purchase wheelchairs for individuals but we can buy them for a group to use, so I was happy to provide the funds. Audrey organized the purchase and delivery of the wheelchairs, in time for the social event of the season, the seniors' Christmas dinner and soiree, which she also organized. Nice working with you Audrey!

HRM GETS A NEW CHIEF

The top job at HRM is CAO or Chief Administative Officer. The CAO manages about 5000 staff and helps turn direction from the Mayor and council into action. After a six month search for a new CAO, this week the Mayor announced the successful candidate is Cathie O’Toole. Cathie is the former General Manager of Halifax Water and former Chief Financial Officer and Director of Infrastructure for HRM. Having served on the search committee, I’m glad to see the reaction is very positive. Here’s more about Cathie O’Toole, HRM's first female CAO:

huddle.today/2022/12/14/10-years-ago-she-helped-expose-a-scandal-in-halifax-now-shes-the-citys-ne...

CORNWALLIS TO NORA BERNARD STREET AND COUNCIL RECAP

Council approved a name change for Cornwallis Street to Nora Bernard Street, the top choice in a survey of HRM residents. Nora Bernard was a Shubenacadie residential school survivor who became a prominent Mi’kmaq activist. She received the Order of Nova Scotia and had a major impact across Canada so I think it’s very fitting that her name was chosen.

novascotia.ca/iga/2008recipients.asp
www.thestar.com/news/canada/2022/12/12/mikmaq-activist-nora-bernard-recommended-as-new-name-for-h...

Other council decisions on Tuesday included:

-redirecting $20 million in funds set aside in 2019 for a community football stadium and diverting it to help offset the budget shortfall and costs of other projects (to be determined);
-a budget increase of $7 million for new sidewalks that I brought in last year was cancelled to help deal with the budget shortfall (related to high inflation, high fuel costs, and high labour costs); very disappointing but I'll keep working on sidewalks.
-acceptance of $8.7 million in funding for transit from the Government of Canada;
-council directed staff to get feedback on a public greenhouse project proposed by the board of the Public Gardens Foundation;
-council approved the proposed polling district boundaries for the next election. The final decision on municipal polling districts and boundaries will be made by the NS Utility and Review Board. The NSUARB will hear public feedback about the boundary review in early 2023. More details here: www.halifax.ca/boundaryreview
-council approved requests to include the Dalhousie President’s Residence on Oxford Street and several other properties in the Registry of Heritage Properties

VOLUNTEER AWARDS DEADLINE – JAN 6

The 2022 HRM Volunteer Awards are open for nominations for another three weeks.
Nominating someone who is serving our community in a volunteer role is a great way to
honour and celebrate them. The categories are Group, Adult and Youth and the deadline is
Friday January 6, 2023. Here’s a link with more details:
www.halifax.ca/about-halifax/volunteering/volunteer-awards

WINTER PARKING

Just a friendly reminder the overnight winter parking ban is in effect during snow storms from
now until March 31. When snow is in the forecast please make sure you have off-street parking. The parking ban is enforced from 1 to 6 a.m. during declared weather events to assist with
snow removal.
The municipality has two zones for the overnight winter parking ban: Zone 1 – Central (Halifax Peninsula, downtown Dartmouth) and Zone 2 – Non-Central (including Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham). Details about overnight winter parking bans will be communicated to residents through public service announcements, hfxALERT, halifax.ca, and @hfxgov on Twitter.

For more information on municipal winter operations, please visit halifax.ca/snow

HOLIDAY LIGHTS

If you haven't had a chance to see the lights at the Public Gardens because of all the rain, the weather looks better later this week:

www.halifax.ca/parks-recreation/events/halifax-public-gardens-holiday-lights

COUNCILLOR KATHRYN MORSE
DISTRICT 10
HALIFAX – BEDFORD BASIN WEST
(FAIRVIEW, CLAYTON PARK AND ROCKINGHAM)
KATHRYN.MORSE@HALIFAX.CA
... See MoreSee Less

NEW WHEELCHAIRS FOR SENIORS HOME; NEW BOSS AT HRM; NORA BERNARD STREET, LESS MONEY FOR SIDEWALKS AND OTHER COUNCIL DECISIONS; NOMINATE VOLUNTEERS; WINTER PARKING BAN IN EFFECT; HOLIDAY LIGHTS

WHEELY WORKING TOGETHER

A few months ago Audrey Bennett got in touch with me (photo right, with friend Brenda Gilks on left).  Audrey is originally from the west coast of Newfoundland and she lives at MacDonald Laurier Place, a senors home on Ford Street.  Audrey is one of those big hearted people whos always organizing card games and special events at the home.  She told me some of the less mobile residents were having trouble getting to the social events and asked for funding for two wheelchairs.  Councillors are not permitted to purchase wheelchairs for individuals but we can buy them for a group to use, so I was happy to provide the funds.  Audrey organized the purchase and delivery of the wheelchairs, in time for the social event of the season, the seniors Christmas dinner and soiree, which she also organized.  Nice working with you Audrey!   

HRM GETS A NEW CHIEF

The top job at HRM is CAO or Chief Administative Officer.  The CAO  manages about 5000 staff and helps turn direction from the Mayor and council into action.  After a six month search for a new CAO, this week the Mayor announced the successful candidate is Cathie O’Toole.  Cathie is the former General Manager of Halifax Water and former Chief Financial Officer and Director of Infrastructure for HRM. Having served on the search committee, I’m glad to see the reaction is very positive. Here’s more about Cathie O’Toole, HRMs first female CAO:

https://huddle.today/2022/12/14/10-years-ago-she-helped-expose-a-scandal-in-halifax-now-shes-the-citys-new-cao/

CORNWALLIS TO NORA BERNARD STREET AND COUNCIL RECAP

Council approved a name change for Cornwallis Street to Nora Bernard Street, the top choice in a survey of HRM residents.  Nora Bernard was a Shubenacadie residential school survivor who became a prominent Mi’kmaq activist.  She received the Order of Nova Scotia and had a major impact across Canada so I think it’s very fitting that her name was chosen.

https://novascotia.ca/iga/2008recipients.asp
https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2022/12/12/mikmaq-activist-nora-bernard-recommended-as-new-name-for-halifaxs-cornwallis-street.html

Other council decisions on Tuesday included:

-redirecting $20 million in funds set aside in 2019 for a community football stadium and diverting it to help offset the budget shortfall and costs of other projects (to be determined);
-a budget increase of $7 million for new sidewalks that I brought in last year was cancelled to help deal with the budget shortfall (related to high inflation, high fuel costs, and high labour costs); very disappointing but Ill keep working on sidewalks.
-acceptance of $8.7 million in funding for transit from the Government of Canada;
-council directed staff to get feedback on a public greenhouse project proposed by the board of the Public Gardens Foundation;
-council approved the proposed polling district boundaries for the next election. The final decision on municipal polling districts and boundaries will be made by the NS Utility and Review Board. The NSUARB will hear public feedback about the boundary review in early 2023. More details here: www.halifax.ca/boundaryreview 
-council approved requests to include the Dalhousie President’s Residence on Oxford Street and several other properties in the Registry of Heritage Properties

VOLUNTEER AWARDS DEADLINE – JAN 6

The 2022 HRM Volunteer Awards are open for nominations for another three weeks.
Nominating someone who is serving our community in a volunteer role is a great way to
honour and celebrate them.  The categories are Group, Adult and Youth and the deadline is
Friday January 6, 2023.  Here’s a link with more details:
https://www.halifax.ca/about-halifax/volunteering/volunteer-awards

WINTER PARKING 

Just a friendly reminder the overnight winter parking ban is in effect during snow storms from
now until March 31. When snow is in the forecast please make sure you have off-street parking. The parking ban is enforced from 1 to 6 a.m. during declared weather events to assist with
snow removal. 
The municipality has two zones for the overnight winter parking ban:  Zone 1 – Central (Halifax Peninsula, downtown Dartmouth) and Zone 2 – Non-Central (including Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham).  Details about overnight winter parking bans will be communicated to residents through public service announcements, hfxALERT, halifax.ca, and @hfxgov on Twitter.
 
For more information on municipal winter operations, please visit halifax.ca/snow

HOLIDAY LIGHTS

If you havent had a chance to see the lights at the Public Gardens because of all the rain, the weather looks better later this week: 

https://www.halifax.ca/parks-recreation/events/halifax-public-gardens-holiday-lights

COUNCILLOR KATHRYN MORSE
DISTRICT 10
HALIFAX – BEDFORD BASIN WEST
(FAIRVIEW, CLAYTON PARK AND ROCKINGHAM)
KATHRYN.MORSE@HALIFAX.CA

Comment on Facebook

Kudos to you, Kathryn, for sending out these monthly updates! They are greatly appreciated! Merry Christmas!

That is very disappointing about the sidewalks, especially in fairview with so many seniors and young families at risk of collision with the increasing traffic on dutch village. Please keep us informed of what the city plans to do to mitigate the risk to pedestrians.

Appreciate receiving updates and so happy to learn how you were able to help with the wheelchairs. What a lovely Christmas gift! Good work!

Thanks for your dedication to the needs of us all!

Well done Kathryn!

Thanks for the update Kathryn Morse Councillor District 10 Halifax-Bedford Basin West ; much appreciated.

Hey Brenda Gilks, you’re famous! Very happy to see this.

MERRY CHRISTMASW KATHRYN

SAFE DRINKING WATER FOR ALL

Thanks Kathryn!

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Was great seeing you today!

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