District 10 and Council Updates

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OUT OF THE COLD AND INTO EMERGENCY HOUSING; JAN 11 COUNCIL HIGHLIGHTS; CHANGES FOR DUTCH VILLAGE ROAD; CONSTRUCTION UPDATE

MODULAR HOUSING OPENS

People will be moving into HRM’s new emergency housing on the Dartmouth waterfront this weekend. The 24 modular units have furnished rooms with shared kitchen, laundry and washrooms. Staff from Out of the Cold community association will provide support for residents around the clock.


www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/emergency-shelter-dartmouth-move-in-weekend-1.6313737



This is the first time HRM council and staff have been involved in providing emergency housing, a service that is the responsibility of the provincial government. Last year there was a big increase in people sleeping rough in city parks and so council stepped in. There were bumps along the way but the first modular units were purchased, installed, and linked to water, sewer and power in four months. Similar modular units will be set up in Halifax in March. Out of the Cold staff will decide who moves into the modulars, giving priority to those with mental health and addictions issues. The project cost HRM $4.9 million, with the provincial government agreeing to pay for staffing and operational costs.

Although the modulars are a positive step, there’s still a huge need out there. Most of the people sleeping rough are in downtown Halifax and Dartmouth, but it’s happening across the municipality. I heard from a number of District 10 residents concerned about the men living in tents on Joseph Howe Drive across from the Superstore. HRM recently hired a full time Housing and Homelessness Coordinator. She assured me the men on Joe Howe have been offered help.

Learn more about efforts to help address homelessness in HRM: www.halifax.ca/about-halifax/regional-community-planning/helping-address-homelessness/

COUNCIL HIGHLIGHTS

Because of Covid restrictions, councillors are back to working from home and attending meetings online. Although I miss seeing my colleagues, our commutes have dropped to 30 seconds. Here’s what we did on Tuesday:

-Moved forward with a plan for an “attainable housing” development in the Southdale neighbourhood of Dartmouth; the project will build about 700 new units, a mix of houses, townhouses and low rise apartments;

-Sent the HalifACT first annual climate progress report to Committee of the Whole on January 21 for detailed discussion;

-Sent options for small business tax relief to Committee of the Whole for full discussion;

-Requested a staff report about the Province’s recent changes related to inclusionary zoning and grants for affordable housing projects;

-Sent some minor amendments for the Seton Ridge development (near MSVU) to a public hearing;

-Designated a beautiful old brick factory at 5663 Cornwallis Street as a heritage property; it was home to Mayflower Tobacco and later Moirs Ltd candy

-First reading on changes to the taxi bylaw to allow online payments for permits and licenses

-Approved entering into a partnership with Portsmouth, England

-Voted against providing financial support for a legal challenge of Quebec’s Bill 21


MORE ROOM ON DUTCH VILLAGE ROAD

It took almost a year, but it looks like my request for some breathing room on Dutch Village Rd will go through next week. New buildings on Dutch Village Road (like the ones at the bottom of Rosedale) are allowed to have 100% lot coverage under the C-2C zone. The C-2C zone was introduced in 2016 and has created problems with sightlines around corners, as well as parking and pedestrian safety issues.

Last March I asked planning staff to review and hopefully reverse some aspects of the C-2C zone. The first recommendation is coming to Halifax and West Community Council on January 18. I'm pleased to see staff are recommending a minimum setback of 1.5 metres (5 feet) for buildings in the C-2C zone. Enough room for a sidewalk! For more details:
www.halifax.ca/sites/default/files/documents/city-hall/community-councils/220118hwcc1011.pdf

CONSTRUCTION NEWS

Next week the largest city-building project in Halifax’s history, the Cogswell District Project, gets underway. It will transform the downtown with new highrise housing, new parks and a new transit hub. What does it mean for you? You may want to avoid the Barrington area near HMCS Scotian if at all possible. That’s where a major detour will be put in place to allow construction to begin. Building the Cogswell District will take a few years, so I expect we’ll get used to the disruptions downtown, but the next few weeks might be bumpy.

Wondering why there were concrete barriers installed at Titus and Dutch Village Road? That was to allow the relocation of a water main ahead of a housing project planned at that corner. I’ll share more details as soon as they firm up.

And sometime in the next few weeks a Clayton Park icon will disappear. That’s right, the Round Tower, at Dunbrack and Willett, is getting set for demolition. You’ll know it’s about to happen because a large crane will be going up just before the tower comes down.

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca
... See MoreSee Less

OUT OF THE COLD AND INTO EMERGENCY HOUSING;  JAN 11 COUNCIL HIGHLIGHTS;  CHANGES FOR DUTCH VILLAGE ROAD; CONSTRUCTION UPDATE

MODULAR HOUSING OPENS 

People will be moving into HRM’s new emergency housing on the Dartmouth waterfront this weekend.  The 24 modular units have furnished rooms with shared kitchen, laundry and washrooms.  Staff from Out of the Cold community association will provide support for residents around the clock.

 
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/emergency-shelter-dartmouth-move-in-weekend-1.6313737

 

This is the first time HRM council and staff have been involved in providing emergency housing, a service that is the responsibility of the provincial government.  Last year there was a big increase in people sleeping rough in city parks and so council stepped in.  There were bumps along the way but the first modular units were purchased, installed, and linked to water, sewer and power in four months.  Similar modular units will be set up in Halifax in March.  Out of the Cold staff will decide who moves into the modulars, giving priority to those with mental health and addictions issues. The project cost HRM $4.9 million, with the provincial government agreeing to pay for staffing and operational costs. 

Although the modulars are a positive step, there’s still a huge need out there.  Most of the people sleeping rough are in downtown Halifax and Dartmouth, but it’s happening across the municipality.  I heard from a number of District 10 residents concerned about the men living in tents on Joseph Howe Drive across from the Superstore.  HRM recently hired a full time Housing and Homelessness Coordinator.  She assured me the men on Joe Howe have been offered help.  
 
Learn more about efforts to help address homelessness in HRM: https://www.halifax.ca/about-halifax/regional-community-planning/helping-address-homelessness/

COUNCIL HIGHLIGHTS

Because of Covid restrictions, councillors are back to working from home and attending meetings online. Although I miss seeing my colleagues, our commutes have dropped to 30 seconds.  Here’s what we did on Tuesday:

-Moved forward with a plan for an “attainable housing” development in the Southdale neighbourhood of Dartmouth;  the project will build about 700 new units, a mix of houses, townhouses and low rise apartments;

-Sent the HalifACT first annual climate progress report to Committee of the Whole on January 21 for detailed discussion;

-Sent options for small business tax relief to Committee of the Whole for full discussion;

-Requested a staff report about the Province’s recent changes related to inclusionary zoning and grants for affordable housing projects;

-Sent some minor amendments for the Seton Ridge development (near MSVU) to a public hearing;

-Designated a beautiful old brick factory at 5663 Cornwallis Street as a heritage property; it was home to Mayflower Tobacco and later Moirs Ltd candy

-First reading on changes to the taxi bylaw to allow online payments for permits and licenses

-Approved entering into a partnership with Portsmouth, England

-Voted against providing financial support for a legal challenge of Quebec’s Bill 21

 
MORE ROOM ON DUTCH VILLAGE ROAD

It took almost a year, but it looks like my request for some breathing room on Dutch Village Rd will go through next week.  New buildings on Dutch Village Road (like the ones at the bottom of Rosedale) are allowed to have 100% lot coverage under the C-2C zone.  The C-2C zone was introduced in 2016 and has created problems with sightlines around corners, as well as parking and pedestrian safety issues.  

Last March I asked planning staff to review and hopefully reverse some aspects of the C-2C zone.  The first recommendation is coming to Halifax and West Community Council on January 18.  Im pleased to see staff are recommending a minimum setback of 1.5 metres (5 feet) for buildings in the C-2C zone.  Enough room for a sidewalk!  For more details:
https://www.halifax.ca/sites/default/files/documents/city-hall/community-councils/220118hwcc1011.pdf

CONSTRUCTION NEWS

Next week the largest city-building project in Halifax’s history, the Cogswell District Project, gets underway.  It will transform the downtown with new highrise housing, new parks and a new transit hub.  What does it mean for you?  You may want to avoid the Barrington area near HMCS Scotian if at all possible. That’s where a major detour will be put in place to allow construction to begin.  Building the Cogswell District will take a few years, so I expect we’ll get used to the disruptions downtown, but the next few weeks might be bumpy.  

Wondering why there were concrete barriers installed at Titus and Dutch Village Road?  That was to allow the relocation of a water main ahead of a housing project planned at that corner.  I’ll share more details as soon as they firm up. 

And sometime in the next few weeks a Clayton Park icon will disappear.  That’s right, the Round Tower, at Dunbrack and Willett, is getting set for demolition.  You’ll know it’s about to happen because a large crane will be going up just before the tower comes down.

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.caImage attachment

Comment on Facebook

Thank you for spearheading the bylaw to NOT permit 100% lot coverage. Similar to what Stephanie Gustys said, and regarding the C-2C zoning, small shrubs lining buildings really softens the hard look. 1.5 m for sidewalks will be a huge improvement, and 2m could allow for sidewalks AND planters 🙂 City-wide, not just district 10 if possible!

I'm really sad to see the round building come down. It was always so unusual. Referencing the new construction, it would be lovely to see some trees or even shrubs lining the new buildings. They even show greenery on their signs, but then fail to actually leave space for it

Rapid Covid testing available today, tomorrow and Friday (Dec 22-24) at Centennial Arena, 27 Vimy Ave in Fairview. Take home Covid tests available while supplies last. For details and hours:
www.nshealth.ca/service-details/COVID-19%20Rapid%20Testing
... See MoreSee Less

Rapid Covid testing available today, tomorrow and Friday (Dec 22-24) at Centennial Arena, 27 Vimy Ave in Fairview. Take home Covid tests available while supplies last.  For details and hours:
https://www.nshealth.ca/service-details/COVID-19%20Rapid%20Testing

Comment on Facebook

Are there still take home kits available?

will there actually be test kits?

Thanks for posting

FAIRVIEW REZONING; KEARNEY LAKE; SETON RIDGE; CLIMATE PLAN; MORE SIDEWALKS PLEASE; AND URBAN DEER

TOO CLOSE FOR COMFORT

A common concern I hear from Fairview residents is that new buildings on Dutch Village Road are too close to the street. Residents feel there's no room to walk and it's hard to see around certain corners when driving.

These two buildings at the bottom of Rosedale are legal under the C-2C zone introduced in 2016. In the C-2C zone, which only applies on Dutch Village Road, 100% lot coverage without setbacks is permitted. Last spring I asked for changes to make sure in the future there is more space for sidewalks and landscaping that is planned for Dutch Village Road.

This week the report I requested came forward and staff are recommending a minimum setback of 1.5 metres and a maximum of 3 metres:

www.halifax.ca/sites/default/files/documents/city-hall/community-councils/211215hwcc1314.pdf

These recommendations will go to a public hearing in January. I'll post details about the hearing as soon as they are available.

KEARNEY LAKE

Clayton Developments will move to the design phase for the housing development proposed for the quarry lands on the Kearney Lake Rd. Once the designs are completed (likely next summer or fall) they will go to a public hearing for approval. In the meantime, I will be working with HRM staff on a management plan for Kearney Lake aimed at protecting water quality.

SETON RIDGE

The Seton Ridge development at MSVU moved a step closer to construction this week and goes to Regional Council in January for public hearing and final approval. This large project began ten years ago and has had a number of technical hurdles, mainly due to the steep slope of Seton Road. Once approved, construction is expected to take 3-4 years.

E FOR EFFORT

At Environment and Sustainability Committee this week we received the first annual progress report on HRM'S climate plan, HalifACT. Although grades weren't given out, had they been, it would probably have been an E for Effort. Although HRM’s plan has received accolades across Canada and internationally, in terms of implementation it’s behind schedule. That's no fault of HRM's small but mighty climate team who are under-resourced. I hope that’s something council will fix through the upcoming budget.
www.halifax.ca/sites/default/files/documents/city-hall/standing-committees/211215essc1211pres.pdf

MORE SIDEWALKS PLEASE

During budget meetings this week, I asked to expand the municipal budget for new sidewalks. HRM has been building only a handful of new sidewalks each year and there are about 600 sidewalk projects in the queue. I asked for an additional $7.5 million to be added to the sidewalk budget but it isn't a done deal. Staff will come back with recommendations in the new year for council to vote on. More details:
www.halifaxexaminer.ca/city-hall/halifax-councillors-to-consider-an-extra-7-5-million-for-new-sid...

FURRY FRIENDS

Residents have contacted me with concerns about the deer roaming around our district. The deer often travel in pairs or threes, but I've seen as many as half a dozen strolling through yards in broad daylight. I've even seen a few walking up the middle of my street! Recently a resident asked me to introduce a deer cull because she was nervous about an aggressive stag in her driveway. Other people have asked me if the deer could be relocated.

Not being a deer wrangler myself, I contacted Hope Swinimer at Hope for Wildlife to get her advice. Hope is an expert in rehabilitation for wildlife. She says it can be fatal for deer if they are captured and relocated because of "capture myopathy" a condition that results from extreme stress and struggle. Relocating animals can also spread disease.

Hope says people should recognize deer aren't always safer outside the city because they could be hit by cars on the highway or killed by predators. She says the kindest thing people can do for urban deer is to refrain from feeding them because it not only encourages them to reproduce, it often interferes with their delicate, four-stomach digestive systems. Even apples are hard for deer to digest, so as tempting as it is to give these creatures a treat, it's much better not to. Definitely no fruitcake.

HERE'S TO 2022

Well we weren't able to avoid Omicron after all. I hope you stay well, stay calm and enjoy the holidays.

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca
... See MoreSee Less

FAIRVIEW REZONING; KEARNEY LAKE; SETON RIDGE; CLIMATE PLAN; MORE SIDEWALKS PLEASE; AND URBAN DEER

TOO CLOSE FOR COMFORT

A common concern I hear from Fairview residents is that new buildings on Dutch Village Road are too close to the street.  Residents feel theres no room to walk and its hard to see around certain corners when driving. 

These two buildings at the bottom of Rosedale are legal under the      C-2C zone introduced in 2016.  In the C-2C zone, which only applies on Dutch Village Road, 100% lot coverage without setbacks is permitted.  Last spring I asked for changes to make sure in the future there is more space for sidewalks and landscaping that is planned for Dutch Village Road.

This week the report I requested came forward and staff are recommending a minimum setback of 1.5 metres and a maximum of 3 metres: 
 
https://www.halifax.ca/sites/default/files/documents/city-hall/community-councils/211215hwcc1314.pdf

These recommendations will go to a public hearing in January.  Ill post details about the hearing as soon as they are available. 

KEARNEY LAKE 
  
Clayton Developments will move to the design phase for the housing development proposed for the quarry lands on the Kearney Lake Rd.  Once the designs are completed (likely next summer or fall) they will go to a public hearing for approval.   In the meantime, I will be working with HRM staff on a management plan for Kearney Lake aimed at protecting water quality. 

SETON RIDGE

The Seton Ridge development at MSVU moved a step closer to construction this week and goes to Regional Council in January for public hearing and final approval.  This large project began ten years ago and has had a number of technical hurdles, mainly due to the steep slope of Seton Road.  Once approved, construction is expected to take 3-4 years.

E FOR EFFORT

At Environment and Sustainability Committee this week we received the first annual progress report on HRMS climate plan, HalifACT.  Although grades werent given out, had they been, it would probably have been an E for Effort.  Although HRM’s plan has received accolades across Canada and internationally, in terms of implementation it’s behind schedule.  Thats no fault of HRMs small but mighty climate team who are under-resourced.  I hope that’s something council will fix through the upcoming budget.  
https://www.halifax.ca/sites/default/files/documents/city-hall/standing-committees/211215essc1211pres.pdf

MORE SIDEWALKS PLEASE

During budget meetings this week, I asked to expand the municipal budget for new sidewalks.  HRM has been building only a handful of new sidewalks each year and there are about 600 sidewalk projects in the queue.  I asked for an additional $7.5 million to be added to the sidewalk budget but it isnt a done deal.  Staff will come back with recommendations in the new year for council to vote on.  More details: 
https://www.halifaxexaminer.ca/city-hall/halifax-councillors-to-consider-an-extra-7-5-million-for-new-sidewalks/

FURRY FRIENDS

Residents have contacted me with concerns about the deer roaming around our district.  The deer often travel in pairs or threes, but Ive seen as many as half a dozen strolling through yards in broad daylight.  Ive even seen a few walking up the middle of my street!  Recently a resident asked me to introduce a deer cull because she was nervous about an aggressive stag in her driveway.  Other people have asked me if the deer could be relocated.

Not being a deer wrangler myself, I contacted Hope Swinimer at Hope for Wildlife to get her advice. Hope is an expert in rehabilitation for wildlife.  She says it can be fatal for deer if they are captured and relocated because of capture myopathy a condition that results from extreme stress and struggle.  Relocating animals can also spread disease.  

Hope says people should recognize deer arent always safer outside the city because they could be hit by cars on the highway or killed by predators.  She says the kindest thing people can do for urban deer is to refrain from feeding them because it not only encourages them to reproduce, it often interferes with their delicate, four-stomach digestive systems.  Even apples are hard for deer to digest, so as tempting as it is to give these creatures a treat, its much better not to.  Definitely no fruitcake.

HERES TO 2022

Well we werent able to avoid Omicron after all. I hope you stay well, stay calm and enjoy the holidays.  

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca

Comment on Facebook

Thank you for the update on the Rosedale/Dutch Village new builds. One has to ask what engineering or planning genius at HRM didn't foresee the problem this construction has caused. We now avoid using Rosedale because of three very close calls in the last few weeks. I can't imagine what is going to happen to buses in the winter when roads are slick and snow piled up in front of the intersection. Too late now but hopefully HRM will see the error of its ways and correct it for future developments. I can foresee many, many more redevelopment situations along Dutch Village.

Thanks for challenging the C-2C zoning with no setback. Once those buildings get hit a few times by cars the developers will realize that 1.5-3m setback was a good idea all along 😉

Not sure how pedestrians are seen with the start of the crosswalk set so far back and behind the poles

Thank you for your hard work and updates

Deer are being KILLED on Dunbrack St. one actually ran into a SCHOOL BUS so maybe YOU should look into it further don't you think???

Margie Morris pls read

Deer cull? Discusting

View more comments

DISTRICT 10 FIREFIGHTERS; AWARDS DEADLINE; SNOW PREPS; KEARNEY LAKE, TRAFFIC CALMING AND WEST END MALL;

FIRE STATION 7

Earlier this week I had a tour of Fire Station 7 (45 Knightsridge Dr) and met some of the amazing firefighters who respond to calls in the growing communities of Fairview, Clayton Park, Rockingham and beyond. A serious and dedicated crew, they headed out (extremely quickly I might add!) on two calls just while I was there. A little known fact: Station 7 not only serves this community, it serves all of HRM by providing a training ground for new firefighters. A big thank you to Fire Chief Ken Stuebing and the Station 7 chief and firefighters for the tour.

VOLUNTEER AWARDS NOMINATIONS-DEC 29TH

The deadline for nominations for the HRM Volunteer Awards is coming up on December 29th. Volunteers are the heart of our communities. You can shine a light on an outstanding volunteer in the youth, individual or group category:
www.halifax.ca/sites/default/files/documents/about-the-city/volunteering/PRvolunteerawards2022nom...

SNOW DAYS

Well that was quite a start to winter! For the most part, I thought crews did a good job this week, especially given it was a major storm, early in the season, and with more snow than was forecast. HRM has snow clearing service standards and timelines based on the priority level of the street. Emergency routes, bus routes, and main arteries are Priority 1 and lower traffic residential streets are Priority 2. For more details:
www.halifax.ca/transportation/winter-operations/snow-clearing

For future storms, if your street has been missed by the plow or salt truck, please call 311 or email them at contactus@311.halifax.ca. By contacting 311 your issue will be forwarded directly to road crews for attention and 311 will create a record so the issue can be highlighted, and hopefully prevented, next time.

If the situation on your street is not addressed, email me with your 311 file number and I'll follow up. A friendly reminder, the winter parking ban goes into effect on December 15th. You can sign up to be automatically notified of parking bans, other non-emergency notices, as well as emergency notifications at hfxALERT:
www.halifax.ca/fire-police/fire/emergency-management/hfxalert

DEC 15 COUNCIL MEETING: KEARNEY LAKE; TRAFFIC CALMING; BIG PLANS FOR WEST END MALL

*There will be a public hearing at 6 pm for Clayton Development's proposal to build highrise housing for 2000-3000 people at Kearney Lake;
*Council will vote on new, neighbourhood-wide and more pedestrian-friendly standards for traffic calming;
*Council will consider a request for a redevelopment of the West End Mall with up to 15 apartment towers, up to 12,500 people and an expanded transit hub. Here are the details:
www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/west-end-mall-apartment-proposal-1.6281324

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca
... See MoreSee Less

DISTRICT 10 FIREFIGHTERS; AWARDS DEADLINE; SNOW PREPS;  KEARNEY LAKE, TRAFFIC CALMING AND WEST END MALL;

FIRE STATION 7

Earlier this week I had a tour of Fire Station 7 (45 Knightsridge Dr) and met some of the amazing firefighters who respond to calls in the growing communities of Fairview, Clayton Park, Rockingham and beyond.  A serious and dedicated crew, they headed out (extremely quickly I might add!) on two calls just while I was there.  A little known fact:  Station 7 not only serves this community, it serves all of HRM by providing a training ground for new firefighters.  A big thank you to Fire Chief Ken Stuebing and the Station 7 chief and firefighters for the tour. 

VOLUNTEER AWARDS NOMINATIONS-DEC 29TH

The deadline for nominations for the HRM Volunteer Awards is coming up on December 29th.  Volunteers are the heart of our communities.  You can shine a light on an outstanding volunteer in the youth, individual or group category:
https://www.halifax.ca/sites/default/files/documents/about-the-city/volunteering/PRvolunteerawards2022nominationformYOUTHnov2.pdf

SNOW DAYS

Well that was quite a start to winter! For the most part, I thought crews did a good job this week, especially given it was a major storm, early in the season, and with more snow than was forecast.  HRM has snow clearing service standards and timelines based on the priority level of the street. Emergency routes, bus routes, and main arteries are Priority 1 and lower traffic residential streets are Priority 2.  For more details: 
https://www.halifax.ca/transportation/winter-operations/snow-clearing

For future storms, if your street has been missed by the plow or salt truck, please call 311 or email them at contactus@311.halifax.ca.  By contacting 311 your issue will be forwarded directly to road crews for attention and 311 will create a record so the issue can be highlighted, and hopefully prevented, next time.  

If the situation on your street is not addressed, email me with your 311 file number and Ill follow up.  A friendly reminder, the winter parking ban goes into effect on December 15th.  You can sign up to be automatically notified of parking bans, other non-emergency notices, as well as emergency notifications at hfxALERT: 
https://www.halifax.ca/fire-police/fire/emergency-management/hfxalert

DEC 15 COUNCIL MEETING: KEARNEY LAKE; TRAFFIC CALMING; BIG PLANS FOR WEST END MALL

*There will be a public hearing at 6 pm for Clayton Developments proposal to build highrise housing for 2000-3000 people at Kearney Lake;
*Council will vote on new, neighbourhood-wide and more pedestrian-friendly standards for traffic calming;
*Council will consider a request for a redevelopment of the West End Mall with up to 15 apartment towers, up to 12,500 people and an expanded transit hub.  Here are the details:
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/west-end-mall-apartment-proposal-1.6281324

Councillor Kathryn Morse
District 10 (Fairview, Clayton Park and Rockingham)
Contact me at kathryn.morse@halifax.ca
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